ASSESSMENT OF SUPERVISORS’ ROLE PERFORMANCE IN TERTIARY EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN KOGI STATE, NIGERIA

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ASSESSMENT OF SUPERVISORS’ ROLE PERFORMANCE IN TERTIARY EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN KOGI STATE, NIGERIA

ABSTRACT

This study assessed the Administrators’ Role Performance in Tertiary Educational Institutions in Kogi State, Nigeria. The study has seven objectives among which were to:

Determine administrators’ role performance in decision making process in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State; assess administrators’ role performance in staff development in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State and ascertain administrators’ role performance in communication in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State. In line with the stated objectives, seven research questions were raised and seven hypotheses were formulated for study. The study adopted survey research design. The target population for the study comprised 9107 administrators, academic and non-academic staff from nine tertiary institutions in Kogi State. A total of 455 administrators, academic and non-academic staff were used as representative sample. A total of 455 copies of questionnaire were distributed to the respondents in Kogi State and 445 were duly completed and returned comprising 3 administrators, 258 academic staff and 184 non-academic staff of Tertiary Educational Institutions Kogi State. The sample size was drawn using cluster sampling technique. Data for the study were obtained through the administration of questionnaire. The bio-data respondents were analysed using frequencies and percentages. The frequency counts, means and percentages were also used to answer the research questions. All the seven hypotheses were tested using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) at 0.05 level of significance. Findings of the study among others revealed that there is significant difference in the responses of administrators, academic staff and non-academic staff on the administrators’ role performance on decision making process in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State (f- Cal = 0.004 ≤ 0.05). Likewise, there is significant difference in the responses of administrators, academic and non-academic staff on the administrators’ role performance on staff development in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State (f- Cal = 0.001≤0.05). Also, there is significant difference in the responses of administrators, academic and nonacademic staff on the administrators’ role performance on communication in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State (f- Cal = 0.013≤0.05). Administrators should involve academic and non-academic staff and in the decision making process. Administrators should adopt a good leadership style to promote free participation in decision making process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

COVER PAGE                                                                                                                            i

TITLE PAGE                                                                                                                             ii

DECLARATION                                                                                                                      iii

CERTIFICATION                                                                                                                     iv

DEDICATION                                                                                                                           v

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS                                                                                                      vi

ABSTRACT                                                                                                                             vii

TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                                        viii

LIST OF TABLES                                                                                                                    xi

LIST OF APPENDICES                                                                                                         xiii

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

1.1          Background to the Study                                                                                             1

1.2          Statement of the Problem                                                                                             5

1.3           Objectives to the Study                                                                                                7

1.4          Research Questions                                                                                                      8

1.5          Hypotheses                                                                                                                   9

1.6          Basic Assumptions                                                                                                     10

1.7           Scope of the Study                                                                                                     11

CHAPTER TWO: REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

2.1          Introduction                                                                                                                12

2.2          Conceptual Framework                                                                                              13

2.2.1       Concept of Assessment                                                                                             13

2.2.2       Concept of Administrators                                                                                        14

2.2.3       Concept of Performance                                                                                            15

2.2.4       Concept of Role Performance                                                                                   16

2.3           Role of Administrators of Organization on Decision Making Process                     18

2.3.1       Stages in Decision Making                                                                                        22

2.3.2       Problems Affecting Rational Decision-Making                                                        22

2.4          Role of Heads of Organization on Staff development                                               24

2.4.1      Types of Staff Development                                                                                       26

2.4.2       Conditions Affecting Accessibility of Staff to Staff-Development                          27

2.4.3       Importance of Staff Development                                                                             29

2.5          Role of Administrators of Organization on Communication                                    31

2.5.1       Channels of Communication                                                                                     35

2.5.2       Types of Communication                                                                                          36

2.5.3       Barriers to Effective Communication                                                                        36

2.6          Role of Administrators of Organization on Maintenance of Discipline                   37

2.6.1       Rules and Regulations Guiding the Institutional Behaviour                                     41

2.6.2       Factors Affecting Discipline                                                                                     43

2.7          Role of Administrators of Organization on Maintenance of Facilities                     44

2.7.1       Types of Maintenance Facilities                                                                                48

2.7.2       Factors Affecting Maintenance of Facilities                                                             49

2.8          Role of Administrators of Organization on Maintenance of Funds                          51

2.8.1       Sources of Funds                                                                                                       53

2.8.2       Constraints Affecting Funds                                                                                      54

2.9          Role of Administrators of Organization on Interpersonal Relationship                    55

2.9.1       Types of Interpersonal Relationship                                                                          57

2.9.2       Challenges Affecting Interpersonal Relationship                                                      58

2.9.3       Relevance of Interpersonal Relationship                                                                   59

2.10        Empirical Studies                                                                                                      59

2.11        Summary                                                                                                                   63

CHAPTER THREE: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1           Introduction                                                                                                               64

3.2           Research Design                                                                                                        64

3.3           Population of the Study                                                                                             64

3.4           Sample and Sampling Procedure                                                                               65

3.5           Instrumentation                                                                                                          66

3.5.1       Validation of research Instrument                                                                             67

3.5.2      Pilot Study                                                                                                                  68

3.5.3      Reliability of the Instrument                                                                                       68

3.6         Procedure for Data Collection                                                                                    68

3.7        Method of Data Analysis                                                                                             69

CHAPTER FOUR: DATA PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS, AND DISCUSSION

4.1          Introduction                                                                                                                70

4.2           Analysis of Demographic Information                                                                      70

4.3         Response to Research Questions                                                                                71

4.4          Hypotheses Testing                                                                                                    85

4.6          Summary of Major Findings                                                                                      98

4.7          Discussion of the Findings                                                                                         98

CHAPTER FIVE: SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

5.1 Introduction                                                                                                              102 5.2 Summary                                                                                                                  102

5.3          Conclusions                                                                                                              103

5.4           Contributions to Knowledge                                                                                    104

5.5          Recommendations                                                                                                    104

REFERENCES                                                                                                                       106

APPENDIX I                                                                                                                          114

APPENDIX II                                                                                                                         115

APPENDIX III                                                                                                                       127

APPENDIX IV                                                                                                                       131

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1: Population of the Study                                                                                              65

Table 2: Sample of the Study                                                                                                   66

Table 3: Classification of Respondents by Status                                                                    71

Table 4: Gender of the Respondents                                                                                        71

Table 5: Opinion of Respondents on Administrators‟ Role performance in Tertiary Education

Institutions on Decision Making process in Kogi State                                                           72

Table 6: Opinion of Respondents on Administrators‟ Role Performance in Tertiary

Educational Institutions on Staff Development in Kogi State                                                 74

Table 7: Opinion of Respondents on Administrators‟ Role Performance in Tertiary

Educational Institutions on Communication in Kogi State                                                      76

Table 8: Opinion of Respondents on Administrators‟ Role Performances in Tertiary

Educational Institutions on Maintenance of Discipline in Kogi                                              78

Table 9: Opinion of Respondents on Administrators‟ Role Performance in Tertiary

Educational Institutions on Maintenance of Facilities in Kogi State                                       80

Table 10: Opinion of Respondents on Administrators Role Performance in Tertiary

Educational Institutions on Maintenance of Funds in Kogi State                                            82

Table 11: Opinion of Respondents on Administrators‟ Role Performance in Tertiary

Educational Institutions on Interpersonal Relationships in Kogi State                                    84

Table 12: Summary of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) on the Administrators‟ Role

Performance in Tertiary Institutions on Decision Making Process in Kogi State                    85

Table 13: Summary of Scheffe‟s Multiple Comparison Test on Administrators‟ Role

Performance on Decision Making Process in Tertiary Educational Institutions in Kogi State      86

Table 14: Summary of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) on the Administrators‟ Role

Performance in Tertiary Institutions on Staff development in Kogi State                               87

Table 15: Summary of Scheffe‟s Multiple Comparison Test on Administrators Role

Performance on Staff Development in Tertiary Educational Institutions in Kogi State          87

Table 16: Summary of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) on the Administrators Role

Performance in Tertiary Institutions on Communication in Kogi State                                   88

Table 17: Summary of Scheffe‟s Multiple Comparison Test on Administrators‟ Role

Performance on Communication in Tertiary Educational Institutions in Kogi State               89

Table 18: Summary of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) on the Administrators‟ Role

Performance in Tertiary Institutions on Maintenance of Discipline in Kogi State.                 90

Table 19: Summary of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) on the Administrators Role

Performance in Tertiary Institutions on Maintenance of Facilities in Kogi State                    92 Table 20: Summary of Scheffe‟s Multiple Comparison Test on Administrators‟ Role Performance on Maintenance of Facilities in Tertiary Educational Institutions in Kogi State.                           92

Table 21: Summary of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) on the Administrators‟ Role

Performance in Tertiary Institutions on Maintenance of Funds in Kogi State.                        93

Table 22: Summary of Scheffe‟s Multiple Comparison Test on Administrators‟ Role

Performance on Maintenance of Funds in Tertiary Educational Institutions in Kogi State     94

Table 23: Summary of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) on the Administrators‟ Role

Performance in Tertiary Institutions on Interpersonal Relationships in Kogi State.                95

Table 24: Summary of Scheffe‟s Multiple Comparison Test on Administrators‟ Role

Performance on Interpersonal Relationships in Tertiary Educational Institutions in Kogi

State.                                                                                                                                         96

Table 25: Summary of Hypotheses Testing.                                                                            97 LIST OF APPENDICES

Appendix I      Letter of Introduction                                                                                      119

Appendix II     Administrators of Institution‟s Role Opinion Questionnaire                         120

Appendix III Private, State and Federal Tertiary Institutions in Kogi State                           132

Appendix IV Private, State and Federal Tertiary Institutions in Kogi State                           133

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

1.1       Background to the Study

Administrators of tertiary institutions, like all other managers in different sectors of the economy, have a set of roles to perform, if the predetermined objectives of the university should be attained.  Some of these roles are: preparation and defending of departmental budgets; attracting financial supports to the department; encouraging scholarly publications and professional journal researches Idumange, (2002); management of human and material resources of the department; coaching and training of staff; and giving of academic and administrative leadership to the department (Bassey & Archibong 2007).  It seems that there is need to sharpen the competence and zeal of these managers through motivation.  Since the effectiveness of university managers is measured by their competence and the extent to which the goals of their exalted office are attained (Ogbodo, 2002), it becomes necessary that they should be appropriately motivated.  John (1986, p.12) conceptualizes motivation to be the internal force that arouses, regulates, and sustains all the more important actions of the individual.  Though intangible it determines the intensity, quality and direction of ongoing behaviour.

Need for achievement is the drive to excel, to achieve in relation to a set of standards, and to strive to succeed; while need for power is the urge to make others behave in a way that they would not have behaved otherwise. The need theory of McClelland (1985) proposes that there are three major motives (or needs) in work situations, namely: need for achievement, need for power; and need for affiliation.   Also, need for affiliation is the desire for friendly and close interpersonal relationship at work environments.  The day-to-day role performance of university managers towards institutional effectiveness seems influenced by McClelland‟s Model (1985) of needs theory. The effective university manager appears to have a high level need for achievement and moderate level need for both power and affiliation.

Higher education in Nigeria is at a crossroad where it must redefine its mission accompanied with measurement standards as to how it is going to meet the needs and obligations to citizens demanding higher education in the 21st century. According to Daft (2008) leadership is one of the most observed phenomenon on earth and one of the least understood. Leadership effectiveness appears to be a complex term without any stated definition or well proved indicator. However, there seem to be a lot of people that have tried to solve the mystery of leadership effectiveness in order to provide the world with the knowledge of how to become absolute effective in one‟s leadership, Great Systems (2007).

According to Bush (2007) there has been great interest in educational leadership in the early part of the 21st century. This is because of the widespread belief that the quality of leadership makes a significant difference to school and student outcomes.  In many parts of the world, there is recognition that tertiary institutions require effective leaders and managers if they are to provide the best possible education for their learners. In the view of Bush (2007) as the global economy gathers pace, more governments are realizing that their main assets are their people and that remaining, or becoming competitive depends increasingly on the development of a highly skilled workforce. This requires trained and committed teachers but they, in turn; need the leadership of highly effective Vice Chancellors, Rectors, Principals and the support of other senior and middle level leaders. Leadership at work in educational institutions is thus a dynamic process where an individual is not only responsible for the group‟s tasks, but also actively seeks the collaboration and commitment of all the group members in achieving group goals in a particular context Cole, (2002).

Leadership in that context pursues effective performance in schools, because it does not only examine tasks to be accomplished and who executes them, but also seeks to include greater reinforcement characteristics like recognition, conditions of service and morale building, coercion and remuneration. Due to the globalization of today, it is of great importance to be effective in more than one institution. Therefore, the term leadership effectiveness seems, to us, to be an important part of today‟s educational institutions. Hence, an interesting question might be what the word effectiveness brings to leadership.

Effectiveness within organizations probably normally means cutting costs and reducing time. However, we find it rather clear that this is not the purpose with leadership effectiveness. Principals, Rectors and Vice Chancellors who are regarded as effective by both staff and school board members focus on both organizational goals and staff members‟ needs Lunenburg & Ornstein, (1996).

In addition to this, they should be knowledgeable about theory and especially those focusing on organizational behaviour and leadership. Davis (1998) stated that two important elements of effective school leadership are; establishing a school vision and fostering positive interpersonal relationships. He also acknowledged that developing a school vision takes time and the institution heads should have the ability to determine the status of the school, identify important aspects of improvement and have a contingency plan to solve problems. They should possess technical skills needed for managerial responsibilities and the ability to reflect upon their practices in which they skillfully integrate knowledge and skills with experience Kozlowski, (1996). While education can learn from other settings, higher educational leadership and management has to be centrally concerned with the purpose or aims of education. These purposes or goals provide the crucial sense of direction to underpin school management Bush, (2007). However, school aims are strongly influenced by pressures from the external environment, and particularly from the expectations of government, often expressed through legislation or formal policy statements. Schools may be left with the residual task of interpreting external imperatives rather than determining aims on the basis of their own assessment of learner needs. The key issue here is the extent to which school managers are able to modify government policy and develop alternative approaches based on school-level values and vision. Day et al. (2001) as cited in Bush (2007) study of twelve „effective‟ schools leads to the discussion of several dilemma in school leadership. One of these relates to management, which is linked to systems and „paper‟, and leadership, which is perceived to be about the development of people. Energy runs through everything as such is a valid concept to study.

All things, animate and inanimate have energy. Shirom (2005) stated that energy at the individual level manifests itself as the degree of well-being experienced by the individual. At the collective level, energy ebbs and flows in an organization thus providing the organization with a unique character by playing a role in the organization‟s ability to be successful, Tosey & Llewellyn, (2002). As educational leaders, energy is the best hope for creating effective leadership for institutions that feel alive. Improving the quality of learning requires strategies which focus on change at the school and classroom levels. Educational leaders of higher institutions can no longer simply wait for instructions or decisions from government. The pace of change, and the need to be adaptable and responsive to local circumstances, requires that educational leaders develop new skills and ways of working. Bush (2007) explained that improving learning outcomes requires an approach to leadership development, which focuses on „instructional leadership‟. This means attempting to change the mind-set of leaders to regard the processes of teaching and learning as central to their role rather than simply leaving such matters to educators.

Higher education should take into account the impact of globalization, the development of information and advance communicative technologies, the rapid change in demand in employment, and the critical need for highly qualified educators who have practical experience in their discipline. As higher education continues to realize enrolment expansion, educators, state governments, and business should begin working in a partnership atmosphere, Alexander, (2000). There is no doubt that one of the keys to unlocking the aspirations and abilities of this remarkable nation lies in the area of educational leadership. There are long lists, published in numerous reports, recited at numerous conferences, contained in numerous newspaper articles, of the challenges facing the systems of education performances expected of them. It is within this context that the assessment of role performances of higher educational leaders is being assessed.

 

 

1.2       Statement of the Problem

Educational practitioners have recognized leadership and role performance as vitally important for administrators of tertiary educational institutions, since it is the engine of survival for the institutions. This recognition has come at a time when the challenges of education development worldwide are more demanding than ever before (Nkata, 2005). The rapid growth of educational institutions and the ever-increasing enrolment require improved management. Mass education at different levels also requires new leadership approaches in order to enhance efficiency and effectiveness in the management of our tertiary institutions. Educators have been struggling over the years to find the combination of approaches that will be most effective in leading schools through these periods of turbulence and change in all sectors of our economy. Presently, tertiary education in Nigeria has seen the light of a lot of leadership misfortunes characterized by series of labour concerns (strikes by ASUU, ASUP), agitations and confrontations with student bodies over fees and accommodations. Given such high stakes as these, and given its high impact, trustworthy leadership is a critical element of success in any organization and the importance of effective educational leadership has never been greater than at present. School failure is incredibly costly in economic, social, and human terms.

According to Cottrell (2008), organizational energy is a powerful force that fuels the success of many high-achieving organizations and Einstein‟s formula, E=MC2 can be borrowed to assess the state of leadership in our tertiary institutions. There is also increasing recognition that schools require effective leaders and managers if they are to provide the best possible education for their learners. While the need for effective leaders is widely acknowledged, there is much less certainty about which leadership behaviours are most likely to produce favourable outcomes. Leadership is mostly about effectiveness, but also about efficiency. Many leaders believe that if an organization is efficient, it will become effective. This is often based on the common belief that if you do the right thing, you can work on doing it right. This leads to the question if one‟s definition of leadership effectiveness could come to a conclusion of how to become effective, and in that case what would the effectiveness result in? As this term of leadership effectiveness does not state what it is, or what would come out of it, why would people strive to become effective?

The quality of education offered by higher educational institutions in Nigeria in recent times has deteriorated substantially, Mohammed & Gbenu, (2007).  In line with the above observation, this study sought to determine the nature of influence exerted on university effectiveness by the achievement motivation level of university managers at the departmental level in selected tertiary institutions in Kogi State, Nigeria.

An administrator‟s role performance of tertiary educational institution in Kogi state for any job is one of the most crucial factors which can determine the administrator‟s success on the job. Administrative leaders at the tertiary level are strategic to the accomplishment of the tertiary educational institutions‟ goal, and the necessity for adequate preparation for them cannot be over-emphasized. This is particularly so because the administrators of institutionary expected to carry out diverse duties which require skills and adjustment. Wescott (2000) observed that individuals assuming the position of tertiary administrator, experience abrupt changes in their work life, adding to the strains and stresses of institution life. Administrative leaders are responsible for the effective management of the institution, but also accountable to the management of the institution. The headship position according to Bowman (2002) requires leadership capabilities which include: effective communication skills, problem-solving skills, conflict-resolution skills, cultural management skills, coaching skills and transition management skills.

Given the demands of the position of administrators of tertiary educational institution, and the crucial managerial role they play, Peters (1994) noted that it is curious that little attention is paid to the manner in which they are chosen and trained, as new administrators are picked from within the academic staff ranks on the basis of factors that have no direct bearing on managerial skills. This view rightly captures the situation prevalent in Kogi tertiary educational system.

However, investigation has revealed that the tertiary institutions in the state are performing sub-optimally and their poor performance indeed threatens the development of tertiary education in the state both at the federal and organized private sectors. This is due to poor involvement of staff in decision making process that has eluded this sector in the state. Another problem is inadequate support for staff development such as workshop, conference, in-service training and continuing education. There is also inadequate communication between the administrators and the staff in the institutions. Lack of maintenance of discipline, facilities and mismanagement of funds has devalued the progress of the institutions in Kogi state. As noted by Nwabueze (1995), the issues and problems in tertiary sector border on instructional autonomy, payment of salaries, academic  allowances and general fringe benefits, government funding of tertiary institutions, students discipline, provision of quality and sufficient academic staff and the adequacy of teaching and experimental facilities. Obviously, this must raise a lot of questions in the minds of analysts as to what extent could the administrators role performance contribute to enhancing the management of tertiary educational institution.

Based on the aforementioned problems existing in tertiary institutions of which Kogi state is not an exception, the researcher is therefore prompted to carry out a research to investigate the administrators‟ role performance in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi state, in order to debunk or affirm previous findings.

1.3       Objectives to the Study

The study was set to achieve the following objectives:

  1. Determine administrators‟ role performance on decision making process in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State;
  2. assess administrators‟ role performance on staff development in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State;
  3. ascertain administrators‟ role performance on communication in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State;
  4. examine administrators‟ role performance on maintenance of discipline in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State;
  5. find out administrators‟ role performance on maintenance of facilities in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State;
  6. assess administrators‟ role performance on maintenance of funds in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State; and
  7. ascertain administrators‟ role performance on interpersonal relationships in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State.

1.4        Research Questions

The following are the research questions of the study:

  1. Do administrators perform roles on decision making process in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State?
  2. How do administrators perform roles on staff development in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State?
  3. Do administrators perform roles on communication in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State?
  4. How do administrators perform roles on maintenance of discipline in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State?
  5. Do administrators perform roles on maintenance of facilities in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State?
  6. Do administrators perform roles on maintenance of funds in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State?
  7. How do administrators perform role on interpersonal relationships in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State?

 

 

 

1.5        Hypotheses

The following hypotheses were formulated for the following study:

Ho1. There is no significant difference in the responses of Administrators (Vice Chancellor,

Provost and Rector), Academic staff and Non-Academic Staff on the Administrators‟ Role Performance in Tertiary Institutions on decision making process in Kogi State.

Ho2. There is no significant difference in the responses of Administrators, Academic staff and

Non-Academic Staff on the Administrators‟ Role Performance in Tertiary Educational Institutions on staff development in Kogi State.

Ho3. There is no significant difference in the responses of Administrators, Academic staff and

Non-Academic Staff on the Administrators‟ Role Performance in Tertiary Educational Institutions on communication in Kogi State.

Ho4. There is no significant difference in the responses of Administrators, Academic staff and

Non-Academic Staff on the Administrators‟ Role Performance in Tertiary Educational Institutions on the maintenance of discipline in Kogi State.

Ho5. There is no significant difference in the responses of Administrators, Academic staff and

Non-Academic Staff on the Administrators‟ Role Performance in Tertiary Educational Institutions on the maintenance of facilities in Kogi State.

Ho6. There is no significant difference in the responses of Administrators, Academic staff and

Non-Academic Staff on the Administrators‟ Role Performance in Tertiary Educational Institutions on the maintenance of funds in Kogi State.

Ho7. There is no significant difference in the responses of Administrators, Academic staff and

Non-Academic Staff on the Administrators‟ Role Performance in Tertiary Educational Institutions on interpersonal relationships in Kogi State.

 

 

1.6        Basic Assumptions

This research was based on the following basic assumptions:

  1. It is assumed that administrators of Tertiary Institutions perform their Roles well in decision making process then there will be smooth running of their organisation.
  2. It is assumed that administrators of Tertiary Institutions perform their Roles well in staff development then there will be smooth running of their organisation.
  3. It is assumed that administrators of Tertiary Institutions perform their Roles well in communication then there will be smooth running of their organisation.
  4. It is assumed that administrators of Tertiary Institutions perform their Roles well in the maintenance of discipline then there will be smooth running of their organisation.
  5. It is assumed that administrators of Tertiary Institutions perform their Roles well in the maintenance of facilities then there will be smooth running of their organisation.
  6. It is assumed that administrators of Tertiary Institutions perform their Roles well in the maintenance of funds then there will be smooth running of the organisation.
  7. It is assumed that administrators of Tertiary Institutions perform their Roles well in interpersonal relationships then there will be smooth running of organisation.

1.6    Significance of the Study

This study was a pioneer attempt to study the administrators‟ role performance in tertiary educational institutions and their contribution towards the success of tertiary administration in Kogi state. Any pioneer effort has its place in the world of knowledge. As this focuses on Kogi state tertiary educational institutions administrators, it may be of value for further research in other states in Nigeria as the organizational and administrative structure of the schools are similar.

The administrators form a strong link between the academic staff and non-academic staff. Both look forward to the administrators for information from either side. The contribution of non-academic staff towards success in tertiary institutions administration was essential.

The study was significant to the vice chancellors, staff, educational planners, administrators and policy makers on some measures that should be taken to improve the quality and quantity of the roles performance of tertiary educational institutions administrators. Such measures would help in solving some of the administrative problems in schools. Therefore, the study will prevent role conflict between administrations and staff in schools.

1.7       Scope of the Study

This study covered all the tertiary institutions in Kogi State. The study also used the data collected within the institutions. The tertiary institutions were randomly selected based on their senatorial zones for sample size.It was not the intention of this study to unrealistically merit or demerit any administrators of tertiary educational institutions or any person that is a subject in the study. It was also specifically to identify the main administrators‟ role performance in tertiary educational institution in Kogi state with a view to improving them. In an attempt to provide answers to the research questions, the opinions of administrators, academic staff and non-academic staff in the tertiary level of education were sited using the questionnaire method. Therefore, the study was restricted to the assessment of administrators‟ role performance in tertiary educational institutions in Kogi State, Nigeria.

 

ASSESSMENT OF SUPERVISORS’ ROLE PERFORMANCE IN TERTIARY EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN KOGI STATE, NIGERIA

 

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