EVALUATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL ADMINISTRATIVE ROLE PERFORMANCE OF PRINCIPALS IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN BENUE STATE, NIGERIA

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EVALUATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL ADMINISTRATIVE ROLE PERFORMANCE OF PRINCIPALS IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN BENUE STATE, NIGERIA

ABSTRACT

The study assessed the InstructionalSupervisory Role Performance of Principals in Secondary Schools in Benue State, Nigeria. The objectives of the study are to find out the principals’ instructional supervisory role performance in checking/marking teachers’ lesson plan/note, Classroom visitation, Teachers’ Adherence to Curriculum Content, Dissemination of information Bulleting/Communication and Facilities Maintenance in Secondary Schools in Benue State. Five research questions and five hypotheses were answered and tested respectively, in the study which adopted the descriptive survey as the design. The population of this study is 2268 comprising88 Principals, 88 Vice Principals and 2092 teachers from seven education zones of Benue State with a sample of 322representing the entire population and was drawn from Research Advisor 2006. Respondents of the study responded to the validated instrument titled assessment of instructionalsupervisory role performance of principals in secondary schools in Benue state (ASRPPSSMBS) with the reliability index of 0.85.This was designed by the researcher in the modified Likert 5-point scale where mean and standard deviation were used in answering the research questions while the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used in testing the hypotheses at 0.05 level of significance. Among others, findings revealed that principals’ instructional supervisory role on checking/marking teachers’ lesson/note,teachers adherence to curriculum content and dissemination of information through bulletin/communication andprincipals’ instructional supervisory role on dissemination of information through bulletin/ communication to teacherswere effective in secondary schools in Benue Statewhile classroom visitationand facilities maintenance were not effective. Based on the findings, the researcher recommends among others thatstate ministry of education in collaboration with educational administrators should organize seminars, workshops and in service to educate principals and teachers of public secondary schools in Benue State onthe current and new format of writing lesson plan/note, efforts should be made by the ministry of education officials to ensure that principals of public secondary schools in the state improve on classroom visitation in Benue State. Ministry of education officials should visit the classes during lesson so that they will see what teachers teach in the classroom.

 

 

 

             

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Cover Page                                                                                                                              i

Title Page                                                                                                                                ii

Declaration                                                                                                                             iii

Certification                                                                                                                  iv

Dedication                                                                                                                   v

Acknowledgements                                                                                                    vi

Abstract                                                                                                                                      vii

Table of Contents                                                                                                                     viii

List of Tables                                                                                                                          xi

Operational Definition of Term                                                                                  xiii

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

1.1       Background to the Study                                                                                            1

1.2       Statement of the Problem                                                                                           8

1.3       Objectives of the Study                                                                                                  10

1.4       Research Questions                                                                                                       10

1.5       Research Hypotheses                                                                                                     11

1.6       Basic Assumptions                                                                                                        12

1.7       Significance of the Study                                                                                               12

1.8       Scope of the Study                                                                                                         13

 

CHAPTER TWO: REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

2.1       Introduction                                                                                                                    14

2.2       Conceptual Framework                                                                                                 16

2.2.1   Assessment                                                                                                                     16

2.2.2  Supervision                                                                                                                      17

2.2.3  Role Performance                                                                                                            18

2.2.4   Lesson plan/note                                                                                                             18

2.2.5  Classroom visitation                                                                                                        19

2.2.6  Curriculum Content                                                                                                         20

2.2.7  Facilities Maintenance                                                                                                     21

2.2.8  Information on Bulletin/Communication                                                                        21

2.3       Theoretical Framework                                                                                                 22

2.4       Role Performance of Principals                                                                                    27

2.4.1 Roles of Principals in Schools                                                                                          27

2.4.2 Types of roles being performed by administrators                                                           28

2.4.3 Roles Performance of Principals in Secondary School                                                    29

2.4.4 Supervision                                                                                                                       31

2.4.5. Types of School Supervision                                                                                           33

2.4.6 Techniques in School Supervision                                                                                   36

2.4.7 Supervison in Secondary Schools                                                                                    41

2.4.8 Problems of Supervision of Secondary Schools                                                               42

2.5       Principals Supervisory Role Performance of Checking and

Marking  Teachers‘ lesson Plan/Note in the attainment of Secondary

Schools‘ Educational Objectives in Benue State                                                          45

2.6       Principals‘ Supervisory Role Performance of Classroom Visitation             in the attainment of Secondary School Educational Objectives in

Benue State                                                                                                                    55

2.6.1 Purpose of Classroom Visitation by the Principal                                                            55

2.6.2. Types of Classroom Visitation                                                                                        56

2.6.3. Strategies Principals require to Take When Carrying out Classroom

Visitation                                                                                                                       60

2.6.4. Classroom Visitation in Secondary Schools Level                                                         60

2.7.      Principals‘ Supervisory Role Performance of Teacher‘s Adherence  to Curriculum Content in Secondary Schools in Benue State.                            61

2.7.1 Teachers Adherence to Curriculum Content                                                                    61

2.7.2. Curriculum in Secondary Schools                                                                                   62

2.7.3. Purpose of a Curriculum                                                                                                  64

2.8.      Principals‘ Supervisory Role Performance on Dissemination  of Information On Bulleting/Communication to Teachers in

Secondary School in Benue State                                                                                  65

2.8.1   Communication in the School Environment                                                                  65

2.8.2. Element of Communication                                                                                             66

2.8.3. Communication in Secondary Schools                                                                           67

2.9.      Principals‘ Supervisory Role Performance on Facilities

Maintenance in Secondary School in Benue State                                                        68

2.9.1. Facilities Maintenance in Teaching-Learning Process                                                    68

2.9.2. Roles of Facilities Maintenance in Training/Learning                                                    68

2.9.3. Facilities Maintenance in Secondary Schools                                                                 69

2.10     Empirical Studies                                                                                                           70

2.11     Summary of Literature Review                                                                                     75

 

CHAPTER THREE: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1       Introduction                                                                                                                    77

3.2       Research Design                                                                                                            77

3.3       Population of the Study                                                                                                 77

3.4       Sample and Sample Technique                                                                                     78

3.5       Instrumentation                                                                                                              78

3.5.1 Validity of the Instrument                                                                                                79

3.5.2 Pilot Study                                                                                                                        79

3.5.3 Reliability of the Instrument                                                                                             80

3.6       Procedure for Data Collection                                                                                       80

3.7       Procedure for Data Analysis                                                                                         81

 

CHAPTER FOUR: RESULTS, ANALYSES AND DISCUSSION

4.1.      Introduction                                                                                                                    82

4.2.      Bio-Data of Respondents                                                                                               82

4.3.      Response to Research Questions                                                                                   84

4.4.      Hypotheses Testing                                                                                                       98

4.5.      Summary of Hypotheses Testing                                                                                104

4.6.      Summary of Major Findings                                                                                       105

4.7.      Discussion of Findings                                                                                                105

CHAPTER FIVE: SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

5.1.      Summary                                                                                                                     109

5.2.      Conclusion                                                                                                                   110

5.3.      Recommendations                                                                                                       111

References                                                                                                                   113

 

  LIST OF TABLES    
Table 3.1: Breakdown of Seven Education Zones in Benue   78
Table 4.2.1: Status of the Respondents   82
Table 4.2.2: Gender of the Respondents   83
Table 4.2.3: Location of the Respondents   83
Table 4.2.4: School type of the Respondents   83
Table 4.2.5: Qualification of the Respondents   84
Table 4.3.1: Principals‘Instructional supervisory role performanceof    
  Checking/Making Teachers‘ Lesson Plan/NoteIn Secondary    
  School Benue State.   85
Table 4.3.2: The Principals‘ Instructional supervisory role performance    
  In classroom visitation in the Secondary School in Benue state.   88
Table 4.3.3: The Principals‘ Supervisory Role Performance in classroom    
  Visitation in Secondary School in Benue State.   91
Table 4.3.4: Principals‘ Supervisory Roles in dissemination of    
  Information bulletin/communication to Teachers in Secondary    
  School.   94
Table 4.3.5: Principal‘s Instructional supervisory role performance on facilities  
  maintenancend its contribution to Secondary School in Benue state 96  
Table 4.4.1 Summary of Analysis of Variance on the principals‘ supervisory role  
  performance of checking/marking teachers‘ lesson plan in Secondary  
  School in Benue State 98
Table 4.4.2 Summary of Scheffe‘s Multiple Comparison Teston theprincipals‘  
  supervisory role performance of checking/marking teachers‘  
  Lessonplan in Secondary School in Benue State 99
Table 4.4.3 Summary of ANOVAon principal‘s supervisory roles of  
  classroom visitation in the secondary school in Benue state 100
Table 4.4.4 Summary of Scheffe‘s Multiple Comparison Test 100
Table 4.4.5 Summary of Analysis of Varianceon the impact of material  
  resources allocation on leadership performance of principals in  
  secondary schools in Benue State 101
Table 4.4.6: Summary of ANOVA on the Principal Supervisory roles on  

 

  Dissemination of bulleting/communication to teachers in the  
  Secondary Schools in  Benue State 102
Table 4.4.7 Summary of Analysis (ANOVA)on the principal‘s supervisory  
  roles performance on Facilities Maintenance in  the secondary  
  school in Benue State 103
Table 4.4.8: Summary of Scheffe‘s Multiple Comparison Teston the principal‘s  
  instructional supervisory role performance on Facilities Maintenance  
  in the secondary school in Benue State 103
Table 4.4.9:

 

 

 

 

Summary of Hypotheses Tested 104
     

 

OPERATIONAL DEFINITION OF TERMS

  1. Assessment: A carefully considered opinion or judgment. It is used at school to monitor teaching and learning in the areas of resource allocation, teacher professional development, special education, curriculum and extra curriculum activities, school leadership, pupils care, guidance and support, personal development, welfare and participation, and overall effectiveness, etc.
  2. Supervisory Role: These are the expected duties of a supervisor that helps to provide the most meaningful guidance, advise, support and educate the teachers, pupils, community members, philanthropist and organizations, etc.
  • Classroom Visitation: The teaching and learning process in the class under the guidance of the teacher that is occasional visited by the Principal in order to correct and moltivate the teacher.
  1. Schools – This refers to all the Government Senior Secondary Schools in the Benue State
  2. Checking/Marking of Lesson Note/Plan: The process of evaluating Teachers

readiness or preparedness to ensure teachers are prepared before entering the class.

  1. Dissemination of information: the process of passing information or massages to all teaching and non- teaching staff in a school.
  • Facilities maintenance: The process of taking care of material resouces within the school premises.

 

 

 

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

 

       1.1       Background to the Study

Supervision in schools is regarded as an aspect of promoting principals‘ efficiency in order to achieve the objectives of the school. It is anticipated that supervision would go a long way to form and re-form the school in accordance with its objectives. However,if supervision is taken thoroughly it will go a long way to improve the standard of school, because supervision goes beyond the idea of inspection and reporting. Robinson (2012) opined that good supervision is regarded as the set of activities that a principal undertakes to ensure that supervision in schools promote efficiency with particular emphasis to secondary schools.

Raouf (2008) sees effective supervision in school as the way of ensuring continuous improvement in all aspect of academic business in a school where teaching and learning meet the needs and expectation of the academics‘ society. This is established around the premises that each step of the process of management of an organization has room for improvement.  Continuous improvement of instruction is based on plan. This method enables the principal to regularly monitor, assess and evaluate the school resources (both human and material resources). Supervision in secondary schools by principals is one of the keysto high academic performance. There is no doubt that in any academic environment, principals‘ efforts in supervision constitute a very vital component in developing study of academic process or

activities.

Affianmagbon (2007) observed that despite some lapses in principals‘ ability to supervise and manage schools, there are still some remarkable advancement in school supervision. The extent to which supervision among principals in secondary schools succeed is important. According to him effective supervision in school improve student‘s academic performance within the school environment.  Supervising role among principals involve all the activities carried out by all others administrative officers and educational stakeholders in the society. However, principals are merely undertaking both administrative role and supervising role in ensuring good and effective academic performance. In another development supervision in schools by principals should as a matter of fact be a collaborative effort by all concerned, government and non-governmental organizations (Affianmaghon, 2015). He submitted that there is looseness on the part of principals.

The role of supervision in education has become very important in recent time because it creates room to improve standard of academic performance of students. According to Osakwe (2010) supervision is seen as the provision of professional help and guidance to teachers and students gear towards the attainment of effective teaching and learning in education environment. The school principals in performing their duties help the teachers to work effectively in the areas of preparation of lesson plan/notes before lesson delivery.Fritz and Miller (2001) observed that the responsibility of making effective teaching and learning in school and the level to which instructional supervisors perform their duties diligently could be based on principals supervisory role. Accordingly, Obi (2004) came up with different methods for principals to assist teachers improve on the academic performance of students. Some of the methods include self-appraisal method, micro-teaching, classroom visitation, clinical supervision, workshop, demonstration method among others. These methods gives feedback to the teacher on the different learning outcomes of the academic system, and also assist to attain the goals of education.

To efficiently carryout supervisory role, the school principal has to plan. Igwe (2001) observed that teachers are always fearful and scared of supervision and as such do not take it in good faith. Peretomode (2001) opined a mutual teachers‘ supervisor relationship during classroom observation.  The problem according to him was that before putting him/her in a pre-visit supervision which might also be instrumental in vanishing teacher‘s apprehension of the forth-coming visit and could provide the principal with the teachers‘ intentions so that both could share a framework of meaning and understanding of the teachers‘ reasoning premises, doubts and specific professional reasons. Apart from the pre-visit supervision, others related classroom visitation would be real observation period and post-visit supervision. Basically, the supervisor sees the lesson so that he may later analyze it with the teacher. Lovell and Kimball (2005) observed that it is essentially necessary that the information constitutes a true, accurate and complete representation of what took place. This would be so because, if the information was serious, false, then the whole exercise becomes worthless.

The relationship between teachers and students is another good area that the supervisor need to pay attention to during classroom visitation as this also could lead to improved instruction.  Using classroom visitation strategy to assess teachers‘ work done demands enough time from principals.  Principal should put in mind that instruction improvement is seen as a top goal in supervisory role.  It becomes rather unfortunate that many principals never spend much time in visiting classes for the purpose of supervision (Lovell and Kimball, 2005). The supervision of academic and administrative activities of secondary schools traditionally falls within the control of the principal.  Formal education in Nigeria is rapidly changing and technically is adjusted towards meeting certain set goals and objectives such as education for all Nigerian citizens (Nwaogu, 2013). The pre-requisite for these various goals from the school principals are based on the advancement of teaching and learning through the involvement of performance based supervisor led by a supervisory team with a principal as the support.

It is expected of the school principal to be effective in carryout his duty not only in human resources but material resources. According to Ukeje (2000) it is observed that inadequate performance always experienced in institution by students and academic programs is often attributed to lack of basic infrastructure, lack of adequate and accurate statistics, inadequate funding, embezzlement, bureaucratic bottleneck and poor attitude to work.

Normally, the principal‘s duty in the supervision of school‘s facilities entails bringing together individuals as a group that will control, coordinate and effective achieve reasonable and entire learning for the overall advantage of the nation (Omokorede and Ikegwuru, 2011). To buttress this,Ebong and Agabi in Nnabuo, Okorie and Agabi (2011), suggest that school supervision by principals is the totality of efforts that brought to bear in the provision and delivery of education to enhance that both human and material resources assigned to schools are used to best benefit in pursuit of academic objectives and goals.

Abdulkareem (2011) observed that to acquire quality education, there must be continuous increase of supervision and adequate school material resources, because the existing ones are often overstretched, poorly maintained and cannot provide, and foster desirable, creative and harmonious problem-solving skills. Generally, in the search by the school to develop the minds and character of future citizens, their abilities, skills and potentials is pertinent in order to equip them for contemporary nation, education material resources have to be supplied in adequate quantities, properly and effectively managed, controlled and supervised (Uko, 2001). According to Uka (2011), it is a duty of top supervisor, down to the teaching and non-teaching staff to supervise at their own levels.

The supervisory role of principal as an instructional supervisor has more than ever before become crucial on the issue of instructional improvement towards effective learning in Nigerian secondary schools.  The National Policy on Education (2004) in Nigeria recognizes the need to ensure quality control through constant inspection and continuous supervision of instruction and other services if national educational objectives are to be meaningfully achieved.

This however, does not mean that this responsibility is limited to a particular building but rather to an organizational segment for a programme, a level of instruction, or a group of grades housed in one building complex or two or more buildings substantially distant from each other.

Supervision came in the 1700s and lasted until the middle of 1800s. Supervision was characterized by a reliance on clergy to provide guidance to and supervision of teachers. As school systems become more complex, the need for more specialized guidance for teachers gave rise to the principal‘s as leader and a growing awareness of pedagogy, (Burthe and Kre, 2005) of scientific management.From the late 1800s until right before World WarII, was characterized by two competing views of education. One was the view that the purpose of education was the promotion of democratic ideals. The other was the view that school function best when approached from the perspective of scientific management. Throughout this era, the scientific approach gained strength and acceptance. The period after World War II, saw a swing away from the scientific approach to an emphasis on developing the teacher as an individual. This period also saw a proliferation of the responsibilities of the supervisors.

The next era, lasting from the late 1960s to the early 1970s, saw phenomenon of clinical supervision one of the most influential movements in supervision. The Hunter model was combined with clinical supervision to produce a widely used but oftentimes prescriptive approach to supervision. The RAND study took a realistic look at the actual practice of supervision and concluded that teachers preferred specific as opposed to general feedback.

(Bruce & Heohn, 1980).

The mid-1990s saw the introduction of the Danielson Model to teacher supervision and evaluation; it was widely applied through K-12 education. Finally, the first decade of 21stcentury witnessed heavy criticism of current supervision practices and the calling for major changes in tenure and compensation.

To enhance the teaching-learning effectiveness in schools, the areas of school supervision have to be carried out in the academic system by the supervisors. Fischer and Cheryl (2004), identified some important areas of school supervision such as follow:

In formulating a well-defined objective of the lesson, as a critical first step,planning provides the direction and framework for the decisions which will follow. The objective is expected to describe the specific content to be learned and the observable behavior the student will exhibit to demonstrate that learning has occurred. No matter how expertly the objectives are stated, they facilitate learning only if they are appropriate to the academic achievement of students. A well-written objectives include specific information on what is to be included in lesson and what is not. This specifically expedites the next step, which is the identification of sub-skills or sub-objective which enables the teacher to be enhanced in order of difficulty to provide a logical sequence to the lesson. Planning the lesson, the administrators will know if the appropriate planning for instruction has taken place when the teacher is able to design a lesson that achieves the objective. This means everything the teacher and students do during the lesson is related to the objective. (Gentile, 1987 in Frscher and Cheryl (2014)

In monitoring students progress, it should be clear that good teaching requires diagnosing student progress during the lesson and adjusting the instruction. According to Stevens, 1986; Hunter, 1982 in Fischer & Charyl, 2014). Periodic and formal assessments of student learning through a midterm or final examination may be helpful in formulating grades, but are not frequent enough to enable the teacher to adjust the teaching to correct the misconceptions. When observing a lesson, administrators should take note of the points in the lesson where teacher is expected to monitor instruction as it progresses to enable them to immediately respond to students‘ misunderstandings and ensure that all students are learning the material. Checking for understanding can be done in large groups by having all the students signal the response at the same time to the same question. This can be done with the use of their fingers to signal multiple choice answers 1,2 or 3, the first letters of a word, or thumbs up or down to indicate true or false (Hunter, 1982 in Fischer and Cheryl, 2014).

In adherence to curricular objectives, the supervisors are required to evaluate and assess the teacher‘s ability to adhere to curricular objectives and comply with this requirement, principals should assume that teachers are utilizing state frameworks, district curriculum guides, scope and sequence chart, and course outlines to assist them in planning instruction. Lesson plants should have clearly defined objectives that are appropriate to the class learning level and consistent with established district school, department, or grade level curriculum standards for expected achievement. Furthermore, plans should include and incorporate the needs, interest and special talents of students in the class and include enrichment or acceleration activities for students who complete basic tasks early. Also time line should be included so that the teacher can monitor the pace of instruction to ensure that the intended curricular objectives are taught and mastered in the allocated time. (Fischer and Cheryl, 2014)

Suitable learning environment is required so that the supervisors can verify and the teachers establish and maintain a suitable learning environment. Therefore, each teacher should develop and implement clear classroom routines and appropriate standards at the planning of each school year to ensure the health, safety, and welfare of their students. This includes maintaining a clean, safe and orderly learning environment that includes establishment of good work habits and discipline. Teachers should post and communicate the classroom standards and procedures as well as the consequences for misbehavior with students and their parents. Administrators should ensure that appropriate behavior is supported with regular and ongoing recognition and reinforcement activities. Mutual respect among students, teacher, and staff should be evident within the school premises and in classroom. Everyone should work co-operatively, communicate with appropriate language. In Addition, administrators are to verify the materials and supplies that will be needed in an emergency including exit routes and students‘ information are readily available (Fischer and Cheryl, 2014).

       1.2       Statement of the Problem

At present, most principals pay little or no attention on managing and administering school. Cawetti and Reavis (2012) observed that principals spent less than a third of their time in supervision.  Principals are reported to have used only 20% of their time for visiting classes and other curriculum related development activities.

Ministry directives (No. 3/1987) clearly stated that as professional leaders, principals are responsible for successful curriculum implementation in education.  This objective could not be possibly attained unless the principals systematically supervise and make it a top priority to do so.  Although supervision can assist to improve the effectiveness of teaching and learning activities in classrooms, but not without problems.  There are many hindrances or obstacles.  According to Shukor (2013) some types of conflict forced the teacher being observed and the principals apart.  Likely due to teachers‘ behavior and knowledge that principals are under qualified and from a different discipline of studies.  For example, an art graduate principals trying to check science teachers.

Okoroma (2002) observed that poor performance in science course had been

characterized to weaken facilities or near-absence of laboratory infrastructural facilities.  Onyeike (2013), pointed out that in some cases the laboratories do not exist or damage beyond repairs, resulting in the poor performance of students in West African Examinations Council (WAEC) and National Examinations Council (NECO), leading to resultant poor quality output from Nigeria secondary schools, especially the public schools.  Ogundipe (2007) opined that the quality of academic output to a large extent depends on the scale of equipment and facilities such as laboratory, workshop, libraries, books, teaching aids and how good they are being put to use.

The primary goal of secondary education is to develop the individual‘s mental capacity and character for higher education and useful living within the nation (Federal

Republic of Nigeria, (FRN), 2004).  In spite of the nation‘s demand for quality supervisor in schools and the need for thorough supervision in schools, there is a growing concern about the realization of secondary school objectives due to doubt that many principals give little or less attention to supervision of teaching and learning activities in secondary schools.  Resultantly, there have been steady fall in teachers teaching and learning job performance and students‘ academic performance which renders non-realization of quality supervision in secondary schools (Adeniji, 2002).  This has been largely attributed to the gaps in teachers‘ competence, curriculum instruction, learning facilities, resources, funding and instructional management.  It is observed in the study that there is a serious challenge ahead of principals partly because of paying little or less attention to their duties, existing gaps, inadequacies in their supervisory roles and laxity on the part of the teachers in their professional role performance in the secondary schools.

 

 

       1.3       Objectives of the Study

The following objectives were formulated for this study to:

  1. find out the principals‘ instructional supervisory role performance on checking/marking teachers‘ lesson plan/note in secondary schools in Benue State, Nigeria;
  2. determine the principals‘ instructional supervisory role performance on classroom visitation in the secondary schools in Benue State;
  3. assess the principals‘ instructional supervisory role performance on teachers‘ adherence to curriculum content in secondary schools in Benue State;
  4. investigate the principals‘ instructional supervisory role performanceon dissemination of information bulletin/communication to teachers in secondary schools in Benue State; and
  5. ascertain the principals‘ instructional supervisory role performance in facilities maintenance on secondary schools in Benue State.

       1.4        Research Questions

The folowong research questions were postulated;

  1. What is         the       principals‘       instructional    supervisory     role      performance        on

checking/marking teachers‘ lesson plan/note in secondary schools in Benue State?

  1. What is the principals‘ instructional supervisory role performanceon classroom visitation in secondary schools in Benue State?
  2. Does principals‘ instructional supervisory role performance of teachers‘ adhere to curriculum content in secondary schools in Benue State?
  3. What is the principals‘ instructional supervisory role performance on dissemination of information bulletin/communication to teachers in secondary schools in Benue State?
  4. What is principals‘ instructional supervisory role performance on facilities maintenance in secondary schools in Benue State?

 

       1.5       Research Hypotheses

The following research hypotheses were formulated and tested for this study;

  1. There is no significant difference in the opinions of Principals, vice principals and teachers on Principals‘ instructional supervisory role performance on

checking/marking of lesson plan/notes in secondary schools in Benue State;

  1. There is no significant difference in the opinions of Principals, vice principals and teachers on the Principals‘ instructional supervisory role performance on classroom visitation in the secondary schools in Benue State;
  2. There is no significant difference in the opinionsof Principals, vice principals and teachers on Principals‘ instructional supervisory role performance on teachers‘ adherence to curriculum content in the attainment of secondary schools in Benue State;
  3. There is no significant difference in the opinions of principals, vice principals and teachers on Principals‘ instructional supervisory role performance on dissemination of information bulletin/communication to teachers in secondary schools in Benue State; and
  4. There is no significant difference in the opinions of Principals, vice principals and teachers on principals‘ instructional supervisory role performance on facilities maintenance for teachers and students in secondary school in Benue State;

        

       1.6       Basic Assumptions

The study is on the assumptions that:

  1. principals‘ checking/marking of lesson plan/notes enhanced teaching-learning process in secondary school in Benue State;
  2. principals‘ visitation to classroom regularly enhances teaching and learning in secondary school in Benue State;
  3. teachers‘ adherence to curriculum contentwill enhance teaching and learning in secondary school in Benue State;
  4. dissemination of information on bulletin/communication to teachers enhances teaching-learning process in secondary schoolsin Benue State; and
  5. school facilities will create favourable learning environment for teaching and process in secondary schools in Benue State.

 

       1.7       Significance of the Study

The findings of this study has both theoretical and practical significance. The theoretical significance depends on clinical supervision theory and technical skill theory. Clinical supervision theory is emphasized using good pattern by the supervisor or principal when supervising classroom teacher while technical skill theory relies on more than one theory and techniques. The theory focuses on making use of different skills in supervision such as assigning some to teach during group, counselor etc.

This study would be useful to principals, vice principals, head teachers, teachers, government/stakeholders researchers, students and the public that benefit from this study because the role of principal and teacher in a school setting should not be underrated.

The principals as the instructional leaders and teachers as the facilitators would find the study useful because the strategies that inspire them to continually assume their role in schools for the attainment of quality assurance will be revealed in the findings of the study.   Government institutions/stakeholders that are responsible for providing adequate educational materials, proper trainings of principals and teachers, adequate accommodation for staff would make use of the findings of this study.Researchers and students that may be interested in carrying out further research study in the area that is related to the study will also find the study useful. Various literature reviews would provide the needed materials for the accomplishment of their work or given tasks.

 

       1.8       Scope of the Study

This study assessedtheinstructional supervisory role performance of principals‘ in secondary schools in Benue state. Itwas carried out in public secondary schools in seven (7) educational zones of Benue state. The targeted respondents are principals, vice-principals, and classroom teachers. The study focus on five (5) principal supervisory roles which were facilities maintenance, dissemination of information, content of curriculum delivery, checking/ marking lesson plan/note and classroom visitation.

EVALUATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL ADMINISTRATIVE ROLE PERFORMANCE OF PRINCIPALS IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN BENUE STATE, NIGERIA

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