ASSESSMENT OF TEACHERS‘ BEHAVIOR AND QUALIFICATION AS MOTIVATING ELEMENTS TO STUDENTS‘ LEARNING SOCIAL STUDIES IN ACADEMIES OF EDUCATION IN NORTH-WEST ZONE, NIGERIA

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ASSESSMENT OF TEACHERS‘ BEHAVIOR AND QUALIFICATION AS MOTIVATING ELEMENTS TO STUDENTS‘ LEARNING SOCIAL STUDIES IN ACADEMIES OF EDUCATION IN NORTH-WEST ZONE, NIGERIA

ABSTRACT

This study assessed Social Studies Teachers‘ Personality and Qualification and their motivational consequences on the academic performance of Social Studies Students in

Colleges of Education in North western Nigeria. The study was guided by Eight (8) Objectives, Research Questions and Null hypotheses each. Survey research method was adopted as the design of the study. The entire population of the study consisted of 7,641.Out of which 196 Teachers, 3,762 NCE II and 3,683 NCE III students were sampled for the study.

Questionnaire titled: Assessment of Teachers‘ Personality and Qualification as Motivating factors to Students‘ Learning (ATQQ) was developed by the researcher through which data for the study was subjected to the use of Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) in computing the descriptive statistics of means and standard deviations to answer the research questions and inferential statistics of the independent samples t-test to test the Null hypotheses. Also, One Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used in the research in order to test the last two independent samples t-test on gender and different qualifications of the respondents. The analysis of the results indicated that no significance difference was found in the opinion of males and females NCE Students of Social Studies on Teachers‘ Personality and Qualifications as  motivating factors to Learning Social studies in Colleges of Education North west zone as the major finding. The finding established that based on teachers‘ degree of motivation, NCE female students are lagging behind as a result of gender and feminine related factors. The research supported the importance of building positive personality relationship between teachers and NCE students in the areas of achievement motivation regardless of gender differences. The findings also indicated that unqualified teacher syndrome negate the academic achievement of the students in colleges of education. Therefore, academic status of teachers should be placed on social studies professionals as against other experts in teaching of Social Studies in Colleges of Education. This is to enable NCE students in colleges of education correspond as professional trained teachers creating a self fulfilling prophecy, positive thinking and value orientation. It was also discovered that personality traits possessed by teachers had also influenced students learning social studies in colleges of education. There is need for teachers to influence students learning social studies with versed personality traits capable of helping students to form new attitudes, knowledge, reflective thinking and problem solving skills.  Out of the Eight (8) Null hypotheses formulated, three (3) were retained (p>0.05) and five (5) were rejected (p<0.05). Based on the findings, the researcher recommended that attention should be given to females NCE students having identified that there are more male NCE Students than females dominating achievement motivation in the Colleges of Education under study .Lastly, the study suggested that a further study could be carried out to examine other factors that impact on academic performance of the NCE Students in Social Studies subject in Colleges of Education of the

North-West zone.

 

                                                    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    

Cover Page ……………………………………………………………………. Error! Bookmark not defined. Itle Page ……………………………………………………………………….. Error! Bookmark not defined.

Certification……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… iv

Dedication…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. v

Acknowledgements…………………………………………………………………………………………………… vi

Abstract………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. viii

Table of Contents………………………………………………………………………………………………………. x

List of Tables………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. xiii

List of Figures…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. xiv

List of Appendices……………………………………………………………………………………………………. xv

List of Abbreviations……………………………………………………………………………………………….. xvi

Operational Definitions of Terms…………………………………………………………………………….. xviii

 

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

1.1      Background to the Study ……………………………………………………………………………………. 1

1.2      Statement of Problem ………………………………………………………………………………………… 3

1.3      Objectives of the Study ……………………………………………………………………………………… 5

1.4      Research Questions …………………………………………………………………………………………… 6

1.5      Null Hypotheses ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8

1.6      Significance of the Study …………………………………………………………………………………… 9

1.7.     Scope of the Study ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 9

CHAPTER TWO:REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

2.1 Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11

2.2 Theoretical Framework ………………………………………………………………………………………… 11

2.2.1 Theories and Models of Personality ……………………………………………………………………. 11

2.2.1.1 The Freudian Theory of Personality …………………………………………………………………. 12

2.2.1.2 Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) ………………………………………………………………. 15

2.2.1.3 Temperament Theory of Personality- The Four Humours/Humors ………………………. 17

2.2.1.4 The Five Factor Model of Personality ………………………………………………………………. 20

2.2.2 Theories and Models of Motivation …………………………………………………………………….. 23

2.2.2.1 Classical Theories of Motivation ……………………………………………………………………… 25

2.2.2.2     Abraham Maslow‘s Theory of Needs ……………………………………………………………. 25

2.2.2.3 Frederick Herzberg – Theory of Motivation ………………………………………………………. 27

2.2.2.4 Douglas MacGregor Theory of Motivation ……………………………………………………….. 30

2.2.3  Social Learning Theory…………………………………………………………………………………….. 31

2.2.3.1 Albert Bandura Social Learning Theory ……………………………………………………………. 32

2.2.3.2 B.F. Skinner Operant Conditioning ………………………………………………………………….. 33

2.3. Conceptual Definitions of Social Studies ………………………………………………………………. 37

2.3.1.      Objectives of Social Studies in Primary Schools ……………………………………………… 38

2.3.2.       Objectives of Social Studies in Post Primary Schools ……………………………………… 39

2.3.3 Scope and the Nature of Social Studies ……………………………………………………………….. 40

2.3.4 History and Justification for the Introduction and Teaching of Social Studies in Nigeria

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 41

2.3.5 Teachers‘ Personality and Students‘ Learning ……………………………………………………… 43

2.3.6 Teachers‘ Qualification and Students‘ Learning of Social Studies ………………………….. 44

2.3.7 Students‘ versus Teachers‘ interaction in Social Studies Classroom management …….. 47

2.3.8. Useful Strategies in Motivating Social studies Teachers and Students. …………………… 48

2.4.      Review of Related Empirical Studies ………………………………………………………………… 49

CHAPTER THREE: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1 Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 61

3.2 Research Design………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 61

3.3 Population of the Study ………………………………………………………………………………………… 61

3.4 Sample and Sampling Procedures ………………………………………………………………………….. 62

3.5 Instrumentation …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 64

3.5.l  Validity of the Instrument ………………………………………………………………………………….. 64

3.5.2 Reliability of the Instrument ………………………………………………………………………………. 65

3.6 Data Collection Procedure ……………………………………………………………………………………. 65

3.7 Statistical Analysis Procedure……………………………………………………………………………….. 66

CHAPTER FOUR: DATA PRESENTATION, RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS

4.1 Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 67

4.2 Analysis of Participants Profile …………………………………………………………………………….. 67

4.3 Answering the Research Questions ……………………………………………………………………….. 68

4.4 Null Hypotheses Testing ………………………………………………………………………………………. 74

4.5 Summary of Major Findings …………………………………………………………………………………. 83

4.6 Discussion of Findings …………………………………………………………………………………………. 84

CHAPTER FIVE: SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

5.1      Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 88

5.2 Summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 88

5.3 Conclusions ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 90

5.4       Contribution to Knowledge………………………………………………………………………………. 91

5.5     Recommendations ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 92

5.6       Suggestions for Further Studies ………………………………………………………………………… 94

 1:  Population of the Study by Status, Levels and Gender 70
2:   Sample for the Study by Status, Levels and Gender 72
3.   Summary of Participants Gender 76
 4:   Summary of Participants Highest Educational Qualification 77
5:   Summary of Participants Status 77
6:    Summary of Participants Level 77
7:    Means and Standard deviations on teacher personality by students‘ gender 78
8:   Means and Standard deviations on teacher qualification by students‘ gender 79
 9:   Means and Standard deviations on teacher personality by teachers‘ gender 80
 10:  Means and Standard deviations on teacher qualification by teachers‘ gender 81
11:  Means and Standard deviations on teacher personality by students‘ level  81
12:  Means and Standard deviations on teacher qualification by students‘ level  82
 13: Means and Standard deviations on teacher personality by teachers‘ qualification  73
 14:  Means and Standard deviations on teacher qualification by teachers‘ qualification 74

REFERENCES ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 95

LIST OF TABLES

15:  Summary of independent samples t-test on teacher personality by students‘ gender       75

16:  Summary of independent samples t-test on teacher qualification by students‘ gender  76

17:  Summary of independent samples t-test on teacher personality by teachers‘ gender       77

18:  Summary of independent samples t-test on teacher qualification by teachers‘ gender 78

19:  Summary of independent samples t-test on teacher personality by students‘ level         79

20:  Summary of independent samples t-test on teacher qualification by students‘ level       90

21:  Summary of one-way ANOVA on teacher personality by teachers‘ qualification          91

22: Summary of one-way ANOVA on teacher qualification by teachers‘ qualification         93

                                               

             

LIST OF FIGURES

 1:   The Relative Position of the Three Interrelating Systems  14
2:     Myers Briggs Type Indicator Model of Personality  17
 3:    Five Factor Model of Personality  21
4:     Maslow‘s hierarchical structure of Needs  30
5:     Skinner‘s Box  34

 

 

LIST OF APPENDICES

A:    Assessment of Teachers‘ Personality and Qualification as Motivating Factor to

Students‘ Learning Questionnaire (ATQQ)  112
B:     T-test Group Statistics on Personality Null One and Two 105
C:     T-test Group Statistics on Motivation Null One and Two 106
 D:    T-test Group Statistics on Personality Null Three and Four 107
 E:     T-test Group Statistics on Motivation Null Three and Four 109
 F:     T-test Group Statistics on Personality Null Five and Six 110
 G:    T-test Group Statistics on Motivation Null Five and Six 111
 H:    Statistics Descriptive Homogeneity Welch One way Null Seven and  Eigh 113

I:      Statistics Descriptive Homogeneity Welch One way Post Hoc Turkey Alpha (0.05)

  116
 J:      Table of Specification for Determining Population Sample Size 119

 

 

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

        ANOVA: One Way Analysis Of Variance
        ASSEP: African Social Studies and Environment Programmes
       ASSP: African Social Studies Programme  
       ATQQ: Assessment of Teachers‘ Personality and

Questionnaire

Qualification
       B.Ed: Bachelor of Education  
       CI: Confidence Intervals  
       Df: Significance Difference  
       ELT:                      Experiential Learning Theory  
       F:                           Total Calculated value ratio   
       FFM: Five Factor Model  
       HSD: Honesty Significant Difference  
       KITA: Keep up the Ass  
        LSQ:                     Learning Styles Questionnaire  
        MBTI:               Myers Briggs Type Indicator  
        M.Ed Master of Education  
        N: Total Number  
        NCE: Nigeria Certificate in Education  
        NPE: National Policy on Education  
        p-value: level  of marginal significant  
        Ph.D Doctor of Philosophy  
        (r ) :                      Pearson Product Movement Correlation  
        SD: Standard Deviation  
        SOSAN: Social Studies Association of Nigeria  

         SPTAMTCMS: Students‘ Perception of Teachers‘ Attitude, Method of Teaching and

Classroom  Management Scale

UNESCO:      United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation

USAID:          United States Agency for International Development

             

OPERATIONAL DEFINITIONS OF TERMS

Abstract Perception:  This involves the understanding of ideas, qualities and concepts which cannot be seen
Accommodators: This refers to human personality that is good at actively engaging with the world and actually doing things instead of merely reading about or studying  them.
Affection: Refer to one‘s preferences for warmth, disclosure and intimacy.
Agreeableness: This refers to the tendency to be compassionate and cooperative rather than suspicious and antagonistic towards

others.

Assimilators: This refers to human personality that is capable of creating theoretical models by means of inductive reasoning.
Motivation: Different energizers given to NCE Students of Social Studies by the Social Studies Teachers
Personality:               Perception of Social Studies NCE Students on Social Studies Teachers in Colleges of Education under Study.
Qualification: Professional training attained by Teachers in Colleges of

Education under study

Teachers: Refers to the Lecturers  of NCE Social Studies in Colleges of

Education

 

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

1.1  Background to the Study

In any educational system, a teacher is expected to perform significant roles in changing the behaviour of the learners; that is, he lays the foundations for perpetuating society‘s cultural heritage and energizing human resources towards social progress. This supports the fact that the teacher is an important variable in not only teaching-learning situation, but also an agent in changing behaviour of the learners.Onyekuru (2010) puts a teacher‘s personality as a crucial factor in arranging the conditions of the learner‘s environment for effective teaching and no man can be a good teacher unless he has feelings of warm affection towards his pupils with a genuine desire to impart to them what he himself believes to be of value.

A study conducted by United States Agency for International Development (2012) states that teachers contributed about thirty percent (30%) permanent changes in behaviour of  student‘s achievement in later life. His knowledge, skills and attitude are instrumental in creating the conditions for learning. Indeed, it is reasonable to say that teachers and parents have more influence on the future of young people than do the members of other professions. Ladan (2014) describes a teacher as the initiator of the learning process, the facilitator of learning skills, the coordinator of learning sequence and indeed the pivotal element in the entire education development‘. This makes the teacher the most formidable determinant of quality learning. Some characteristics of an effective teacher have been discussed in several studies. For example, according to Onyekuru (2010), a teacher is a very significant figure in the school environment where he works and so his/her personality and professional qualification to work tend to have significant implications which cannot be dismissed if academic excellence is to be achieved in our educational institutions. It is very clear that a teacher‘s way of thinking and beliefs guide his/her behaviour in decision making in or outside the classroom. It is observed by this researcher that most studies carried out in the past focused on the aspect of teachers‘ personality in terms of social studies classroom management while neglecting qualification of teachers as a motive to students learning. In reality, a Teacher‘s personality and qualification are two sides of the same coin and does not affect classroom discipline but do affect teacher-student relationship for academic gains. It is also observed that the extent which a teacher‘s personality affects students‘ motivation is very low without given emphasis on his qualification. Needless to say that there is a positive relationship between teacher personality and qualification as motivating factors to students learning of Social Studies in Colleges of Education. Therefore the study is suggesting that a Teacher‘s personality and qualification should be one of the criteria in the employment of social studies teachers. The behaviour of the teacher should be checked side by side in diverse ways, such as interaction with students, teaching methods, and learning experiences. The teacher should ensure that his personality and qualification speak positively to the students in encouraging them to learn in teacher training institutions in Nigeria.

Most teachers in Nigeria have problem in achieving the goals of teaching as a profession because they are faced with the problems of inadequate exposure to pedagogical skills in teaching, poor classroom management and control, shallow subject matter knowledge, lack of professionalism and inability to motivate learners among others. In order to carry out the teaching task effectively and efficiently, a teacher is to be guided by some principles aspect of teaching and learning which have great implication in promoting students learning. To achieve academic excellence in the primary, Secondary and tertiary levels of education, the personality and qualification of teachers are very vital elements.

Despite the growing body of researches devoted to the study of personality factors, academic performance, and students-teacher relationship across levels of education. The Personality of a teacher according to Akinlana,2012 & Areepattamannil 2011, is a self expression of one to the outer world. A student starts shaping his personality from birth through his/her interaction with numerous variables; that is, he lays the foundations of his own life. In our modern social life, a healthy personality development enables the individual to perform his social role effectively, to lead an organized happy life and to gain recognition in the society (Gambo, 2012). Schools, as social institutions are the main environmental factor, very effective in the development of personality. Teachers and parents are the ones who influence the students most. Studies have shown that the personality of a teacher particularly in tertiary institutions surely affects his students learning ability. As studies carried out on the classroom teaching learning, it is observed that students while evaluating their teachers in terms of subject mastery, also pay more attention to assessment of their personalities rather than their professional characteristics and thus adopt those personality traits as theirs.

1.2 Statement of Problem

For many years, teaching which used to be regarded as a noble profession has been taking over by impostors who have no interest in classroom teaching, but rather an opportunity at hand (Ladan 2014). The low employment opportunities prevalent in the country have contributed to recruitment of the classroom teachers who are unqualified, who look upon teaching as a stop-gap which should be jettisoned as soon as their dream for the next available jobs are obtained.

Also, there are qualified teachers who received relevant training in education for their teaching in different subject areas up to a minimum level, but are not familiar with the intricacies of teaching especially on how to arouse learners‘ interest and readiness. For instance, a Geography teacher who teaches Social studies, History or Religious studies in a secondary school is regarded as unqualified teacher as he neither received training in Social studies education, Religious education nor History education as the case may be. Such teachers are not familiar with the intricacies of teaching; they have low motivational level and may not bother much about their efficiency or teaching effectiveness.

Most of the academic problems are solved if the teacher stimulates learning through his professional qualification and personality. This means that effective teaching implies qualification and positive relationship (personality) with both contributing in students‘ learning performances. In addition, the essence of being an effective teacher lies on what to do to motivate students‘ learning; there will be quality if one is self-motivated and responsible as a teacher. The essence of being an effective teacher lies on what to do to motivate students‘ learning. This is because students draw from their teacher‘s disposition to form their own attitudes which eventually influence their learning outcomes.

The Effectiveness of teaching depends upon six components as identified by Ezenwani (2010) i.e. appreciating and encouraging students, respect for student personality and equality, social Interaction, professional enthusiasm and motivation, occupational or professional attitudes, and reflective interaction. Improvement in competencies of a teacher is either possible when the teacher properly planned for teaching, maintain class-room environment and maintain personality. Professional attitude of a teacher during teaching in class-room can be adjudged from his personality, knowledge, communication and management skills (Kadiri 2013). Also, the personality of teacher is consider as a basis for standard school build on effective and efficient teachers in terms of personality traits and motivation of learners (Andapai 2013). Consequently,  many researchers conducted on the qualities of a teacher in relation to students academic performance without studying the impact of teacher‘s personality in relation to learning in teacher training institutions and the extent which teacher‘s personality traits affects students‘ motivation.

Wilson (2011) states that there is also a positive relationship between teacher personality traits and learning and the personality traits does not affect classroom discipline only but also affect teacher-student relationship for academic gains. The Teacher‘s personality suppose to be among the criteria in the employment or recruitment of teachers by employers apart from educational qualification poses. Most of the immoral conducts associated with teachers are resulted from non conformity with the personality of the teacher which could be checked in diverse ways, such as interaction with students, teaching methods, and learning experience. The teacher should ensure that his personality speaks positively to the students in encouraging them to learn in tertiary institutions in Nigeria.

It is in realization of the current trend in the recruitment of unqualified teachers and personality of some teachers teaching in Primary, Secondary Schools and Teacher training Colleges in the North- western Nigeria that prompted the researcher to embark on the present study which is geared towards assessment of Social Studies teachers‘ personality and qualification as motivating factors to students‘ learning in Selected Colleges of Education in North-western Nigeria.

The problem of this research hinges on the determination of the extent to which Social Studies teachers‘ personality and qualification influences characteristics on the attitudinal disposition of learners and their interest towards learning especially in the case of teacher training colleges.

1.3 Objectives of the Study

The major objectives of this study are to assess Social Studies Teachers‘ Personality and

Qualification as Motivating factors to Students‘ Learning of Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria, but specific objectives of the study are to:  

  1. Find out the opinion of male and female Social Studies students‘ regarding the impact of teachers‘ Personality as a motivating factor in learning Social Studies in

Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria.

  1. Find out in the opinion of male and female Social Studies Teachers‘ regarding the impact of teachers‘ personality as a motivating factor in learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North- Western Nigeria.
  • Find out in the opinion of male and female Social Studies students‘ regarding the impact of teachers‘ qualification as a motivating factor in learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North- Western Nigeria.
  1. Find out in the opinion of male and female Social Studies Teachers‘ regarding the impact of teachers‘ qualification as a motivating factor in learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North- Western Nigeria.
  2. Find out in the opinion of male and female Social Studies Students‘ of different NCE levels regarding the impact of teachers‘ personality as motivating factor to learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria.
  3. Find out in the opinion of male and female Social Studies Students‘ of different NCE levels regarding the impact of teachers‘ qualification as motivating factor to learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria.
  • Find out in the opinion of male and female Social Studies teachers‘ with different personality traits regarding the impact of teachers‘ personality as a motivating factor

in learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria.

  • Find out in the opinion of male and female Social Studies teachers‘ with different qualifications regarding the impact of teachers‘ qualification as a motivating factor in

learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria.

1.4 Research Questions

Based on the objectives stated above, the following Research Questions of the study emerged:

  1. Is there any gender difference in the mean opinion scores of Social Studies students‘ on Social Studies teachers‘ personality as a motivating factor to learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North Western Nigeria?
  2. What is the gender difference in the mean opinion scores of Social Studies students‘ on Social Studies teachers‘ qualification as a motivating factor to learning of Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria?
  • Is there any gender difference in the mean opinion scores of Social Studies teachers‘ regarding the impact of their personality as a motivating factor to learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria?
  1. Is there any gender difference in the mean opinion scores of Social Studies teachers‘ regarding the impact of their qualifications as a motivating factor to learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria?
  2. To what extent does the mean opinion score of NCE Social Studies students differ regarding Social Studies teachers‘ personality, as a motivating factor to learning of Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria?
  3. What is the difference in the mean opinion scores of NCE Social Studies students‘ on the impact of Social Studies teachers‘ qualifications as motivating factor to learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria?
  • What is the difference in the mean opinion scores of Social Studies teachers‘ of different qualifications regarding its impact as a motivating factor to learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria?
  • To what extent does the mean opinion score of Social Studies teachers of different personality traits differ regarding the impact of personality as a motivating factor to learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria?

 

1.5 Null Hypotheses

The following Null hypotheses of the study are postulated based on the above

Research Questions:

  1. There is no significant difference in the mean opinion scores of male and female Social Studies students‘ regarding the impact of personality as a motivating factor to learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria.
  2. There is no significant difference in the mean opinion scores of male and female Social Studies students‘ on Social Studies teachers‘ qualification as a motivating factor to learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria. iii. There is no significant difference in the mean opinion scores of male and female Social Studies teachers‘ regarding their personality as a motivating factor to learning of Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria.
  3. There is no significant difference in the mean opinion scores of male and female Social Studies teachers‘ regarding their qualifications as a motivating factor to learning of Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria.
  4. There is no significant difference in the mean opinion scores of NCE II and III Social Studies students‘ regarding Social Studies teachers‘ personality as a motivating factor to students‘ learning of Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria.
  5. There is no significant difference in the mean opinion scores of NCE II and III Social Studies students‘ regarding Social Studies teachers‘ qualifications as a motivating factor to learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria. vii. There is no significant difference in the mean opinion scores of Social Studies teachers‘ with different personality traits regarding its impact as a motivating factor to learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria.

viii. There is no significant difference in the mean opinion scores of Social Studies teachers‘ with different qualifications regarding their qualifications as a motivating factor to  learning Social Studies in Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria.

1.6       Significance of the Study

The findings of the study on the Assessment of Social studies teachers‘ qualification and personality as motivating factors to students learning in selected Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria have paramount importance to teachers, student-teachers, parent and government. An assessment by USAID (2012) on Universal Basic Education Programme and teaching in the core subjects including social studies in most primary schools in the zone, suggests a very low academic performance as a result of unqualified teachers syndrome. A dominant questions and discussion in the minds of educational stakeholders is; what are those factors that accounts for the poor performance of learners in various schools? Why do students lost interest studying social studies as a career? The findings of this study highlight Teachers‘ Qualification and Personality as among the factors that should be taken into consideration because of its consequences on motivation of Students and Teachers and performance in Social Studies. The study can enlighten some Teachers on the need to develop positive attitudes, skills and competency as strategies toward motivating their students to learn.

1.7.       Scope of the Study

Assessment of Social Studies Teachers‘ Qualification and Personality as motivating factors to students learning in selected Colleges of Education in North-Western Nigeria is the current topic of research. The study intends to cover all the Colleges of Education in the Northwestern Nigeria by extension representing Seven (7) states namely; Jigawa, Kaduna, Kano, Katsina, Kebbi, Sokoto and Zamfara states. But due to the time constraints and financial cost implication, the study will cover some of the Colleges of Education out of the twelve (12) existing Colleges of Education owned by the States and Federal Government in the North western Nigeria. Also, consideration is given to the Colleges of Education with existing Social Studies as a course of study at NCE level in the institutions covered by the study.

ASSESSMENT OF TEACHERS‘ BEHAVIOR AND QUALIFICATION AS MOTIVATING ELEMENTS TO STUDENTS‘ LEARNING SOCIAL STUDIES IN ACADEMIES OF EDUCATION IN NORTH-WEST ZONE, NIGERIA

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