BEGINNING TEACHERS FINDING SUPPORT  THROUGH AN ONLINE TEACHER NETWORK: AFFINITY  LEARNING  

0
184

BEGINNING TEACHERS FINDING SUPPORT  THROUGH AN ONLINE TEACHER NETWORK: AFFINITY  LEARNING  

ABSTRACT

Teacher             attrition          remains          a          concern          in         the       field     of         education;         while               this      is          not       a          new     problem,         the       reasons           why        teachers          tend     to         leave    the       profession      are       concerning.    Recently,         the    Carnegie         Foundation    for       the       Advancement             of         Teaching

(2014)    found              that      nearly             one      third    of         all        teachers          leave    the       profession         within              their    first     three    years;              many               cited    a          lack      of    administrative            and      professional    support           as         a          major              factor              in    their    decision          to         seek     alternative      employment.              “The    problem          takes    many      forms,             including         the       feeling             of         being               isolated           from    colleagues,        scant    feedback         on        performance,             poor    professional    development,    and      insufficient     emotional       backing           by        administrators”         (p.7).    While              there      is          no        replacement               for       a          solid    teacher           induction        program,    it          is          clear    that      teacher           educators       need    to         find      alternative      and      expansive          ways    to         provide           intellectual      and      emotional       support           to         new        teachers          as         they     enter    the       profession,     helping            them    focus    not       only        on        their    pedagogical    and     content           knowledge      skills,               but       also     on    nurturing        their    emerging        and      constantly       evolving          teacher           identifications.    One      way     that      teachers          are       able     to         achieve           this      level    of         additional    support           on        their    own,    bridging          the       gap      from    the       University       to         their       initial               in         service            positions         (supplementing         what    can      sometimes         be        less      than     ideal    professional    development),           is          to         turn     to    online              teacher           communities,              or        what    I           term    online              teacher    affinity            spaces.

The        purpose          of         this      study               was      to         investigate      the       types    of    support           beginning       teachers          perceive          they     obtain             from    voluntary        membership     within              a          particular       online

 

teacher              affinity            space               called              The      English            Companion     Ning    (EC    Ning).              Using               a          qualitative      ethnographic             approach,       I           sought    to         identify           the       types    of         discursive       practices         that      emerge           as         beginning          teachers          participate      in         the       content-­‐specific       online              space.    It          incorporates              sociocultural              and      social               learning          theories          (Gee,      2006;              Lave    and      Wenger,          1991;              Wenger           1998)              to         explore              how    beginning       teachers,         often    considered     legitimate        peripheral      participants,      display            patterns          of         membership               and

interaction,        as         well     as         how     they     position          and      identify           themselves     as    beginning       teachers          within              the       discussions     they     engage            in.

The        results             of         this      study               suggest           the       potential         of         online    teacher           affinity            spaces             to         support           beginning       teachers,         both       professionally            and      emotionally.    A          salient             finding            is          that      beginning          teachers          tend     to         take     up        various           degrees           of         participation     in         the       EC        Ning    and      this      can      be        closely             tied      to         the    levels               of         support           they     experience     at         their    schools           of         employment.     In         addition,         the       EC        Ning    displayed        elements         of         affinity    space               that      provided         beginning       teachers          the       opportunity    to         conduct    important       identity           formation       and      experimentation.       The      utilization       and      implementation            of         these    types    of         spaces             as         supplemental             support,    as         early    on        as         in         teacher          education       programs,       have    the       potential    to         provide           beginning       teachers          with     the       reinforcements

they        need    in         order              to         survive            and      thrive              during             their    first        years    of         teaching.                     TABLE            OF       CONTENTS    

              

LIST       OF       FIGURES        ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..           vii               LIST    OF       TABLES          ………………………………………………………………………………………………………               viii      ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS       ……………………………………………………………………………………………               ix

Chapter            1                      Introduction            ……………………………………………………………………………………………            1

Autobiographical      beginnings      ………………………………………………………………………………………….          2

Digital              Context              of           the        Study    ……………………………………………………………………………………………..    6

Web               2.0         Tools    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………             6

Ning               …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..         8

The     English              Companion     Ning     …………………………………………………………………………………………..         9

Purpose           of           Study    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..                 12

Significance    of           the        Study    ………………………………………………………………………………………………..    13

Research         Questions        ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..        14

Glossary          of           Terms                 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………    15

Chapter            2                      Literature     Review          ………………………………………………………………………………..             17

Supporting    Beginning        Teachers          ……………………………………………………………………………………                  17

Supporting    Beginning        Teachers          in           the        Digital                Age       …………………………………………………….        18

Review             of           Online                Teacher             Learning           ……………………………………………………………………………..        22

Making         Practice              Public                  ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….        24

Leveraging                  Mentoring          and        Mediation           …………………………………………………………………………………….        24

Conclusion    ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..    30

Chapter            3                      Theoretical    Frameworks             …………………………………………………………………….             32

Situated          Learning           Theory               ………………………………………………………………………………………………    32

Distributed    Intelligence    …………………………………………………………………………………………………                 33

Identity        ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….                   33

Legitimate     Peripheral       Participation                 …………………………………………………………………………….           34

Teacher           Learning           Communities                 ……………………………………………………………………………………              36

Communities             of           Practice              ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………     37

Affinity         Spaces                  ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..                 38

Social                Nature                of           Language          ………………………………………………………………………………………………    41

Heteroglossia            ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….               43

Big                  “D”        Discourse           …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………      45

Chapter            4                      Methods        and     Approaches              ……………………………………………………………………              48

Background                  Information    ……………………………………………………………………………………………….    49

Researcher    Positionality    ………………………………………………………………………………………………..    50

Methods          of           Gathering        Data     …………………………………………………………………………………………….       52

Observation               and        Fieldnotes          ………………………………………………………………………………………………………           52

Interviewing              …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………             53

Iterative          Data     Analysis            ……………………………………………………………………………………………………              57

Bricolage     Interpretation                  of           Text      ………………………………………………………………………………………………    57

Additional     consideration:              Ethics                 in           a             Digital                Study    ……………………………………………………         60

Chapter            5                      Four    Unique           Cases              ……………………………………………………………………………….             63

Cecilia:             Predominantly             Peripheral       ……………………………………………………………………………….        66

Leia:    Gaining              Ground              ………………………………………………………………………………………………………          71

Jolene:              Balance             Believer            …………………………………………………………………………………………………              76

Roxanne:        Newbie              Nourisher        ………………………………………………………………………………………….          81

Chapter            6                      Ethnography            of         EC        Ning:               Patterns        and     Practices          ……………………………..    88

General            Ethnographic                Description    ……………………………………………………………………………….        88

Major            Topics                  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………             91

Degrees           of           Participation                 …………………………………………………………………………………………………              97

Degree          #1:         Reading               Posts    ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..         100

Degree          #2          :              Seeking                Support               …………………………………………………………………………………………………..       103

Degree          #3:         Extending           Support               ……………………………………………………………………………………………….        112

Degree          #4:         Externally          Collaborating    …………………………………………………………………………………….               118

Conclusion    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..       119

Chapter            7                      Discussion,    Implications,            and    Future            Study              …………………………………..            121

Discussion     ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..       121

Impact          on          Teacher               Learning             and        Retention           ………………………………………………………………………..     122

Teacher        Identity               Formation         ……………………………………………………………………………………………………              125

Additional     Considerations             …………………………………………………………………………………………..         126

Scaffolding                 and        Digital                  Criticality           …………………………………………………………………………………………..        126

Time              and        Access                  ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..       128

School           Culture                …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….                  130

Future              Studies              ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….               131    References    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….    133     APPENDIX        A:         Recruitment             Script             ……………………………………………………………………….    141     APPENDIX     B:         Initial             Interview      Question        Guide             ………………………………………………..          142     APPENDIX     C:         Expanded      Ethnographic           Coding               Manual          ……………………………………         143

Chapter          1         

              

Introduction

“To            educate               as           the         practice              of            freedom              is            a             way       of    teaching             that       anyone                can        learn.    That      learning              process                comes    easiest    to           those    of            us           who       teach    who       also       believe                 that       there     is            an          aspect      of            our        vocation             that       is            sacred;                who       believe                 that       our        work         is            not         merely                 to           share    information       but         to           share    in            the         intellectual            and        spiritual              growth                of            our        students.             To          teach    in            a    manner               that       respects              and        cares    for          the         souls     of            our        students              is    essential             if             we          are         to           provide                the         necessary           conditions          where    learning                  can        most     deeply                  and        intimately          begin”                  –             bell        hooks,    Teaching            to           Transgress:       Education          as           the         Practice              of            Freedom             (1994,      p.            13)       

              

As          hooks              states,              the       work    that      teachers          do        alongside        students            is          powerful

and         important;      the       teaching          profession      is          “sacred”.         However,        today’s    beginning       teachers          are       often    given    contradictory             messages        in         this      regard.               In         today’s            political           and      social               climate,           teachers          are    often    the       first     to         suffer              the       burden            of         blame              for       the       many      perceived       failings            of         schools.           In         the       midst               of         pervasive    discourse        on

standardized     testing,            value-­‐added             assessment     and      achievement               gaps,    teacher              attrition          is          a          focus    of         teacher           education       and      educational       policy.             Recently,         the

Carnegie            Foundation    for       the       Advancement             of         Teaching         (2014)            found     that      nearly             one

third       of         all        teachers          leave    the       profession      within              their    first     three    years.     When              researchers    interviewed    teachers,         their    main    reasons           for       leaving               the       profession      weren’t           low      pay      or        difficult           students;         rather,    many               cited    a          lack      of         administrative            and      professional    support    as         a          major              factor              in         their    attrition.          “The    problem          takes    many      forms,             including         the       feeling             of         being               isolated           from    colleagues,        scant    feedback         on

performance,    poor    professional    development,             and      insufficient     emotional       backing    by        administrators”         (p.7).    This     sentiment       is          old       news    to         teacher           educators          and      scholars          that      cite      a          lack      of         support           from    colleagues    and      administrators           as         a          detriment       to

beginning          teacher           development              (Darling-­‐Hammond,            2001;              Strong,    2009;              Connelly,

2000;     and      Ingersoll,        2003).             It          is          clear    that      the       field     needs              to    continue         to         find      alternative      and      expansive       ways    to         provide           intellectual        and      emotional       support           to         new     teachers          as         they     enter    the    profession,     helping            them    focus    not       only     on        their    pedagogical    and      content    knowledge      skills,               but       also     their    emerging        and      evolving          teacher           identities.                       We       have    a          responsibility             as         teacher           educators       to    provide           beginning       teachers          with     the       support           that      they     need    to         fully        “share             in         the       intellectual      and      spiritual          growth            of         our      students”           (hooks,            p.         13).

Autobiographical     beginnings

 

Sonia     Nieto    (2003)            points              out       that,     “all       teaching          is          ultimately

autobiographical”         (p.        9),        and      the       reasons           why     I          am       approaching    my       work    as         a          teacher           educator         on        the       support           of         new     teachers            are       deeply             enmeshed       in         my       own     journey           as         a          secondary         teacher.           I           began              my       own     work    as         a          secondary      English               Language        Arts     teacher           in         a          dream-­‐like               atmosphere,    one    devoid             of         explicit            neoliberal       pedagogy        or        a          hidden            curriculum        of         making            sure     that      teacher           education       students          were    seen       but       not       heard.                         As        a          Professional    Development             School    intern              pursuing         certification    in         Secondary      English            Language        Arts,    I    had      the       opportunity    to         begin               my       teaching          career             amidst             a    community     of         educators       that      valued             teacher           inquiry,           peer    observation,      and      an        open    door    policy;             it          was      a          local    professional    community        that      was      both    inviting            and      constructive.              In         addition          to    co-­‐teaching              for       the       duration         of         a          year,    I           also     had      the       opportunity      to         belong             to         a          teacher           inquiry            group              that      met         once    a          week    and     discussed        educational    philosophies,              teaching          strategies,          and      approaches    to         supporting     diverse            students.         I           conducted    my       own     action              research         project            on        how     teachers          could               transform          the       classroom       by        creating          a          space               for       authentic        student              presentation.              I           visited             and      was      invited             to         teach    in    peers’              and      other    faculty             members’       classrooms.    I           presented       my       academic           work    at         a          professional    conference     at         the       end

of            the       year.    In         short,              my       first     year     as         a          member          of         a    professional    education

community        was      both    dynamic          and      rewarding.

When     I           moved             on        to         my       first     year     of         teaching          at         a    secondary      school             in         Brooklyn,        N.Y.,     I           found              an        equally            stimulating        and      responsive     community.    The      administrators           made               sure     that         the       teachers          in         our      small    staff     (there              were    fourteen         of         us)    had      the       chance            to         pursue            professional    development              in         a          variety    of         capacities,       both    relevant          to         our      individual       teaching          practices    and      the       larger              context            of         the       urban              student           population      that         we       served.            For      example,         our      principal         provided         full       funding    for       the       entire              staff     to         travel              to         Connecticut    for       a          weeklong    summer          workshop       focused           on        how     to         support           gifted               students.    During            the       school             year,    we       were    encouraged    to         work    with     local    artists,    musicians,       and      professionals             to         develop           unique            and      engaging    elective           classes,            like      the       Healthy           Living              enrichment     cluster             that         paired             with     a          local    nutritionist     trained            by        Dr.       Oz        and      the    television        production     club     that      utilized            the       studio              facilities          of         the    nearby            community     college.            I           was      faculty             advisor           for       our      school’s             newspaper     and      was      given    the       privilege         to         work    with     a          local       NYC     journalist        as         my       co-­‐mentor.    For      a          New     York    City      public    school             with     a          declining         budget            threatened     by        a          “meet              AYP        or        close    your    doors              in         six        months”          ultimatum,      we       all        did    the       best     we       could               to         keep    our      students          and      our      developing     pedagogical

philosophies     at         the       forefront        of         our      practice.

Even    though            I           felt       supported      by        my       administration           and      colleagues      and

experienced      significant       growth            as         a          young              teacher           in         a          variety    of         ways,               I           couldn’t          help     but       still      feel      shameful         in         my    newness.         As        a          first     year     teacher           with     a          room

between             two      seasoned        educators       that      had      been    working          with     students    for       a

combined          total     of         40        years,              I           felt       a          pressure         to         project    myself             as         the       expert             teacher           that      I           perceived       them    to         be.    While              I           was      given    plenty              of         opportunities             to         talk      about    students          and      pedagogy        with     my       colleagues,      as         a          teacher           without    tenure,            I           felt       uncomfortable           admitting        that      I           was      having             anxieties,           insecurities,    and      even    failures,           too.      For      example,         not       only     had         I           never              taught             students          as         young              as         the       6th        grade     class    I           was      assigned,         but       I           was      not       yet       confident        in         what       I           then     perceived       as         my       classroom       management              skills.               In    addition,         I           struggled        to         find      my       voice    with     other    school             stakeholders,    like      parents,          school             psychologists,            and      special             education

teachers.

During               that      first     difficult           and      rewarding      year,    I           found              solace    outside            of         my

local       school             community     through          my       interactions    with     my       teacher           education          peers,              many               of         whom              had      moved             on        to         teaching             positions         in         demographically        diverse            assignments.              Because    we       were    all        teaching          in         different         contexts,         hours              away    from    one    another,          we       relied              on        social               networking     to         maintain         contact    and      to         engage            in         supportive      talk      about              the       journey           of         being      and      becoming        teachers          of         English

Language           Arts.    While              emails             were    frequently      sent     back    and      forth,    we       also     utilized            Facebook        to         exchange        messages        of         advice,             comfort,             and      support           with     one      another.          When              I           didn’t              feel    quite    comfortable    sharing           a          disastrous      lesson             or        a          scary    parent    interaction      with     my       school             colleagues,      I           looked             forward          to         signing               onto    my       computer        to         seek     advice             and      resources,      and,     often,     read    words             of         sympathy,       comfort

or           pity      from    my       teacher           education       peers.

It            wasn’t             until     I           started            working          at         another           secondary              school,            this      time     in

rural       Pennsylvania,             that      I           realized           just      how     much               I           depended    on        my       outside            teacher           networks        to         keep    me       afloat.              The      summer             before             I           started,           my       new     principal         took     me       on        a    tour     throughout     the       high     school             building          that      I           was      now     to         call    home.              After    a          long     walk    down               the       hallways,         shining            from    floor       wax,     but       scented           with     the       remnants        of         broken            pencils            and         neglected        gym     clothes,           he        finally              introduced     me       to         my       classroom.         After    pointing          proudly           to         the       newly              paint    walls    and      just-­‐installed               carpet,             he        demonstrated,           with     wide    arm     gestures,         exactly    where             my       desk    should             go        (at        the       “front”             of         the       classroom)        and      where             the       students’         desks               should             go        (in        careful,              neat     rows    facing              the       chalkboard     at         the       “front”             of         the    room).             He        admonished    me       to         resist               the       temptation      to         apply    masking          tape     lines    to         make    sure     students          knew               where             to         keep       their    desks               or        for       rearranging    the       desks               in         any      way,     so    as         to         avoid               marking          up        the       fresh    carpet.             He        also     emphasized       how     important       it          was      for       me       to         keep    posters           and      other      “wall    ornaments”    to         a          minimum,       for       fear     that      I           might               sully       the       new     paint    job.      I           was      crestfallen.      How    would              I           hold     Socratic             seminars         if          the       desks               were    figuratively     chained           to         the    floor?              Where             would              I           hang    and      display            student           work?

How       would              I           negotiate        my       position          as         new     teacher           in         the    district            with     the       feelings           of         resistance       I           felt       about              the       implicit               pedagogical    and      epistemological          values             of         my       new     school    community?                The      teaching          philosophies              and      ideologies       that      undergirded     the

simple    event               of         my       first     school             tour     became           even    clearer            as    I           started            the       school             year.    Feeling            the       theme              of         isolation    wrapped         in         dissent,           I           once    again    turned             to         my       trusted            community        of         beginning       teachers.         Again,              the       support           and      camaraderie     I           felt       as         a          member          of         my       informal          community     was        beneficial,       both    to         my       evolution        as         a          teacher           and      as         an    individual       working          out       what    I           believed          about              pedagogy        and      instruction.        I           remember      the       elation             I           felt       when               a          peer    described          the       same    uncertainties              about              teaching          grammar        rules    and         the       pride    I           experienced    when               I           told

about     my       positive           Friday             phone             call       home               to         the       parents    of         a          struggling       student.

The     description     above              from    my       own     early    years    of         teaching          is          not            unlike

what       many               beginning       teachers          face     –          uncertainty     about              job       security,             lack      of         confidence      in         student           and      stakeholder    interactions,    and      myriad            philosophical             and      pedagogical    contradictions            that      pass     their       way.     I           came    to         develop           an        interest           in         how     new     teachers    find      support           like      I           did       and      what    that      meant              for       the       profession.

Particularly       interested       in         technology,     and      a          millennial        myself             (Howe    &          Strauss,

2000),    I           was      intrigued         by        the       types    of         interactions    and      collaborations    afforded         by        Web    2.0       tool      for       teachers.

Digital              Context         of        the      Study

 

Web      2.0      Tools

 

Web       2.0       has      been    considered     a          major              factor              in         the       way       that      communication

has         changed          over    the       last      decade.           The      Internet          has      moved             from       being               a          primarily        consumption              oriented          space               to         a    more    creation-­‐based        arena,              where             users    of         all        types    can      establish    and      share               their    original           material.         In         addition,         Web    2.0       has

broken    down               barriers          of         communication.         The      implementation         of         digital     technologies               in         education       has      allowed           users    to         collaborate     without              temporal         or        geographic     hurdles           and      has      become           quite    ubiquitous.        While              many               platforms        for       interactivity    have    cropped          up    since    the       advent             of         Web    2.0       technology,     there    remain            a          few      major     outlets             for       individuals      to         communicate,             collaborate,    and      create    content           on        the       web.    Most    notably           are      blogs,              micro              blogs,    wikis,               social               network          sites,    and

social      network          platforms        (See     Table               1.1).

 

 

Web       2.0        Tool      Affordances/Examples               Social     Interaction      Depiction           
Blog/Micro              Blog Created     by           an            individual             and            then        read        by           an            audience.                  The         readers                  are             able        to            comment               on              the          blog        post.       Micro     blogs         take        up           the          same      framework               as            traditional

blogs,        but          require                   users      to               limit       themselves           to            a                 certain                   amount                  of               characters.

 

Example:                  Twitter

 

Focus        on           individual             blog

Wiki Web-­‐based            documents            or            pages         that         can          be            edited     and            collaborated         on           by           multiple                   people    at             one         time           or            asynchronously.

 

Example:                  Wikipedia

 

Focus        on           specific                  content

Social        Network                   Site “Web-­‐based          services                 that         allow

individuals              to            (1)          construct                  a              public    or            semi-­‐public          profile    within    a              bounded                   system,                  (2)          articulate                  a              list          of            other         users      with        whom    they        share         a              connection,           and

(3)             view       and         traverse                 their          list          of            connections          and            those      made      by           others    within       the          system”                 (boyd     &                Ellison,                  2007)

 

Example:                  Facebook              or            LinkedIn

 

Focused    on           individuals           who           then        cohort    with        other         individuals

Social        Network                   Platform Individuals              work      on           their       own           to            interact                  with        other         individuals           or            just

communicate          within    the          larger     format       of

an               interest                  group.                    Groups      align       and         organize                themselves,             but          cross      paths      with           other      interests                and         groups      within    a              shared    space.                        Individuals           can          be            members                  of            multiple                groups.

 

Example:                  Ning

 

Focus        on           group     interactions,            with        affordance                of            individual                interactions

Table     1:           Examples         of           Web     2.0        tools   

Ning

 

Ning       (www.ning.com)        is          a          platform         introduced     in         2005    that      allows    users    to         create               their     own,     independent               social               networks.        These      networks,        ranging           from    communities              of         skateboard     enthusiasts     to    diabetes          sufferers,        function          similarly          to         popular           social               networking        media              like      Facebook        and      LinkedIn;        they     allow    users    to         build       personal         profiles           while               also     belonging       to         groups            of         their       interest.          In         addition,         Ning    offers              affordances    like      personal         blogging,            video               uploading,      real-­‐time      chatting,          and       image              sharing     capabilities.     However,        the       Ning     platform          is          unique             because           it         fosters     an        environment              of         community,     not       individuality.               The      developers         of         Ning

describe             this      aspect:                        The      first     major              difference       between          a    Facebook        group              and      a          social               network          on        Ning                is          that        a          social               network          on        Ning    is          its        own     social               network.    It’s      not       a          group.             It’s        not       a           club.     It’s       your     own     MySpace         or     Facebook        for       your     own     particular       passion,          interest,          cause,              location,    or        community     (Bianchini,      2007).

The         English            Companion    Ning

 

 

 

The        English            Companion     Ning    (EC      Ning)               exemplifies     one      such    community        on

the           Ning     platform          and      is          the       site       of         this      digital              ethnographic     qualitative       study.             Membership                requires          obtaining        a           username       and          a           password,       but       is          open                to         the      public.             When              members           sign     onto    the       main    page,    they     are       greeted           by        the       EC        Ning       logo,     which              displays           a           group              of         teachers          holding            a     book                with     the       motto:             “English          Companion:    Where             English            teachers            go        to         help     each    other”[1] .           Created           by        Jim       Burke,             a    well-­‐known              author,            researcher     and      practitioner    in         the       field,    the       EC    Ning    offers              an        online              space               for       teachers          to         come    together    around            the       practice           of         teaching          English            Language        Arts.    Burke,    whose             commercial    success           has      led       to         his       book    being               utilized    in         English            teacher           methods         courses,          capitalized      on        already           existing              communities              of         educators        from     organizations             like       the       National              Council            of         Teachers         of         English           (NCTE)            and      the       National             Writing           Project            (NWP).            He        has      worked           to         keep    the    EC        Ning   non-­‐commercial      by        asking             for       members        to         fill        in         applications      to         join      and      by        having             moderators    greet    and      interact           with        new     members.       When              Ning    began              charging         for       its        website    hosting            in         2010,               Burke              initiated          a          movement      to         have    members           of         the       group

donate    to         keep    it          running;          it          is          still      in         effect               today.

Educators          of         various           experience     levels               and      geographic     locations         can               discuss

topics      from     assessment     to         classroom       management,              share               ideas                about      planning          a

novel       unit      based              on        A          Tale      of         Two     Cities,               engage            in         book       club     discussions,                and     exchange        advice             and      best     practice           ponderings.       The      main    source             of         conversation              and      dialogue           revolves     around            the       site’s                various            discussion       groups,            of         which              there       are      272.      After                signing            into      the       English            Companion     Ning     with         their     login                information,              members        can      gain     access             to         the    different         groups            through          a          link      on        the       homepage.      The       groups     are       arranged         by        topics              or         themes            of         inquiry            and      invite     members        to        engage             in         discussion       around            specific            interests          underneath        the       umbrella         of         the      teaching          of         English            Language        Arts.       Examples        of         groups            within              the       space               range              from    “Teaching           Shakespeare”             to         “Common        Core     Reading           Strategies”      to         “Classroom       Management”             to,        finally,             “New    Teachers,”      which              is          the    primary          focus    of         observation    in          this      study.              What               happens          in     the       EC        Ning     space               is,         essentially,      a          sharing            of         the      knowledge        of         the       teaching          of         English            Language        Arts.    As        of         April       2014,               there    are       over    forty    thousand        members.[2]

While              teaching          English            Language        Arts     methods         courses           for       the       past     five

semesters,         I’ve      asked              my       own     teacher           education       students          to         become              members        of         EC        Ning.    I’ve      also     become           a          member          and         have    gained             insight             into      the       way     that      the       online              network    functions,        both    semiotically    and      socially.           When              a          previous         student    of

mine,      then     in         her      first     year     of         full-­‐time        teaching,         emailed           me       to    thank               me       for       showing          her      the       space,              I           began              to         think      about              the       impact             of         EC        Ning    on        new     teachers.                     I    wondered       how     other    beginning       teachers          like      my       student           would              progress            as         they     exited              the       safety              and      theoretically               dense    atmosphere    of         the       university       and      entered           the       often-­‐unstable         teacher    workforce      awaiting          them.                           I           began              to         develop           questions    about              its        function          and      the       practices         that      other    members        take     up    within              the       environment,             like      what    are       the       benefits           to         beginning    teachers          of         having             asynchronous            spaces             in         which              to         engage    in         discussion      and      sharing           resources       of         the       teaching          of         English?             How    might               participation              in         the       EC        Ning    site      extend    what    beginning       teachers          can      do        and      how    they     develop           as         educators?        How    might               online              teacher           networks        foster              a          sense     of         collaboration             and      non-­‐contrived         collegiality?

How       might               these    settings           provide           induction        phase              teachers          with        the       support           they     need    to         feel      successful       in         their    first     few      years      of         teaching?        It          is          because          of         these    questions        that      I           decided              to         conduct           a          digital              ethnography              within              the       EC    Ning    space               and      formulate       more    refined            research         questions.

Purpose           of        Study

 

The        purpose          of         this      study               is          to         understand    the       types    of              support           beginning

teachers             acquire           from    membership               within              a          particular       online    teacher           affinity            space               called              The      English            Companion     Ning    (EC    Ning).              Using               a          qualitative      ethnographic             approach,       it          seeks   to         identify           the       types    of         discursive       practices         new     teachers          take     up    the       content-­‐specific       online              setting.            It          incorporates              sociocultural    and      social               learning          theories          (Gee,    2006;              Lave    and      Wenger,          1991;     Wenger,          1998)              to         explore           how     beginning       teachers,         traversing    the       realm              of         student           to         teacher,           display            patterns          of         membership     and      interaction,     as         well     as         how    they     position          and      identify    themselves     as         beginning       teachers.         As        a          former            high     school             English               teacher           and      doctoral          student           working          with     beginning       educators,         I           have    become           interested       in         the       ways    in         which              they        obtain             pedagogical    understandings         and      nourish           their    evolving          teacher

identifications.              In         addition,         because          of         my       experiences    with     digital    tools,    I           seek     to         understand    how     they     form    and      take     up        practices         within    online              teacher           networks        around            these    understandings.         Connected    to         these    inquiries         are       the       ways    in         which              beginning       teachers          utilize     Web    2.0       tools    to         publically        work    through          their    initiations       into      the    field     of         education.       As        Lieberman      and      Pointer            Mace    (2010)            maintain,    the       practice           of         making            teaching          public:                         …facilitates     improved    teaching          and      that      all        teachers          can      benefit            from    making

their       practices                                                                                                                         public             and      sharing                                                                                                                             them             with     each                                                                                                                                 other.             ‘Public’                                                                                                                                                in             this      sense,

means    making            artifacts          and      events                                                                            of        practice,          and      reflections      on        practice,

available            to         interested       educational    audiences                                                          (p.             78).

The        social               and      public              nature             of         online              teacher           networks          provides         a

conceptual         foundation     for       this      study,              as         it          highlights        means             for    an        alternative      venue              for       new     teachers          to         share               stories,            increase             their    knowledge      about              teaching,         and      express           themselves     through             publically        accessible       discursive       practice.

 

Significance                of        the      Study

 

            This        study               is          significant       because          it          adds    to         the       body    of    research         on        virtual             teacher           learning          spaces.            While              scholars    have    explored         the       structures       and      practices

of            these    environments            before,            it          is          important       to         note     that      there      is          very     little     to         account           for       teachers’         own     perceptions    about    why     they     are       helpful.            While              there    are       many               studies            on        how        formal             professional    development              can      be        moved             onto    online    spaces,            the       study               of         non-­‐formal,              voluntary        participation              in    an        online              teacher           learning          space               is          rarely              mentioned      in    the       scholarship.    This     study               seeks               to         fill        a         gap      in         the       literature           by        exploring        the       reasons           why     beginning       teachers          voluntarily        seek     membership               within              the       EC        Ning    and      what    they     perceive            they     obtain             through          membership.              In        addition,         it          provides            insight             into      the       patterns          of         membership               and

degrees              of         participation              that      are       taken               up        in         the       EC        Ning.

              

Research         Questions

 

Based              on        my       initial               questions        embedded      in         my       experience     as            a          methods

course    instructor       and      a          secondary      English            Language        Arts     teacher           myself,               I           decided           to         focus    on        the       following        research         questions:

  1. What    motivates        beginning       teachers          to         voluntarily      utilize              the       EC           Ning    space               for

support?

  1. How do        they     perceive          and      describe          the       support           that      they     find      on           the       EC        Ning   space?
  2. What    discursive       and      participatory              practices         unfold             in         the       EC           Ning,    particularly    the       New     Teachers        group?            How    do        these    practices           work    to         serve    beginning       teachers          in

the          process           of         identification              and      belonging       to         a          community?

 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Glossary          of        Terms

 

Affinity              space:            a          space               that      allows             groups            of         people    to         come    together          with     a          central

purpose             and      goal,    sharing           common                                                                    interests     and      agreeing         on        modes             of

participation     (Gee,    2006).

Beginning         teachers:       Both    pre      service            and      induction-­‐phase      teachers          (Fessler,            1995).

Community      of         practice         (COP):            a          group              of         people             that      come      together          with     a          central

purpose             and      goal,    sharing           a          common                                                      interest     and      agreeing         on        modes             of

participation     and      community     and      cultural                                                                 reifications    (Wenger,        1998).            

Computer         mediated      communication       (CMC):            textual             or        multimodal

communication             that      is          afforded         by        digital                                                     tools    like      computers.

Legitimate       peripheral    participant    (LPP):            A          newcomer      to         a          community        or        space.

Established                                                                                                                                               by             Lave    and                                                                                                                               Wenger             (1991)                                                                                                                                             but             also     appropriated                                                                                                                         in             connection

with        Gee’s    (2006)            affinity            spaces             for                                                                 the     purpose          of         this      study.

Lurker              (reader):       preferably      referred          to         as         “reader”          in         this      study.     A          participant      in         an

online    community     that      reads               communications                                            and         content           rather             than

posting              or        creating          content.           Participants                                                       can      move               fluidly              within              and      out                                                                             of

this         category.

Online    teacher          learning         space:            another           term    used    to         describe          a    web-­‐based

community                                                                                                                                        where             teachers                                                                                                                                          come             together                                                                                                                                               to             share                                                                                                                                            and             learn    about                                                                                                                          teaching.

Participation:             for       the       purposes        of         this      study,              there    are       two      main       types    of

participation,                active              and      passive.           Active              refers              to         when      members        of         an        online                          learning          community     create              and         respond          to         messages        and      interactions    within              that      community.    Passive              refers              to         when               members        of         an        online              learning    community     consume         or        read    within              a          space.              Participation              is    fluid     and      can

shift.

Professional    learning:       Easton             (2008)            defines            this      as         learning          that        puts     the       onus    on

the          learner            and      is          embedded      in                                                                        context    of         their    classrooms.    Used    here    as         a

replacement      for       professional    development.

Social    networking               site:    Defined           by        boyd    &          Ellison             (2007)            as    “…a      web-­‐based    service

that        allows                                                                                                                     individuals             to         (1)                                                                                                                                   construct             a          public                                                                                                                                    or             semi-­‐public                                                                                                                             profile             within

a             bounded                                                                                                                       system,             (2)       articulate                                                                                                                                a             list       of                                                                                                                                         other             users    with                                                                                                                                whom             they     share                                                                                                                                       a

connection,       and      (3)       view    and      traverse                                                                        their       list       of         connections    and      those

made      by        others             within              the       system”           (p.                                               10).

Teacher            identity:        a          fluid     and      recursive,       socially            constituted     process    of         being               and

becoming          a          certain            kind     of         teacher.

Teacher            identification:          the       way     that      a          teacher           describes        or        refers     to         him      or        herself

Teacher            learning:       can      refer    to         the       development              of         teachers,         either     in         formal

settings             like      teacher           education       and      professional    development              programs,         or

informal            settings           like      through          Web    2.0       tools.

Web       2.0:     the       progression    of         digital              tools    from    static    website           consumption     to         more

dynamic             creation          and      collaboration.

[1] Image and motto retrieved from http://englishcompanion.ning.com/

[2] This number is up 10,000 members since this study began in 2012

BEGINNING TEACHERS FINDING SUPPORT  THROUGH AN ONLINE TEACHER NETWORK: AFFINITY  LEARNING  

Leave a Reply